Good Ethics: Reflection On Ethics And Leadership

758 Words 4 Pages
When considering this process of ethics, it is important to keep in mind that it is one thing to have ethics (everyone has ethics), but it is another thing to develop good ethics. This statement reflects on current ethical standards. The practice and relaxed punishment of poor ethics is currently being imitated. Society’s acceptance of poor ethics has followed Skinner’s automatic process stage. Consistent practice of good ethics today is no longer considered automatic, but uncommon. Due to the intense speed and demands of today’s leaders, reflection is forgotten because of lack of time. The reflection step must be reinstated in the ethical process for good leadership to develop. These specific results are obtained by a life full of observation …show more content…
Many leaders today say one thing, but act in other ways. This is not effective or ethical. If society wants ethics to improve, we must not only speak, but also act ethically. Ethics and leadership can be traced back to Roman or Greek history, but this section will focus on ethics and leadership history beginning with the design of America’s government. The Constitution of the United States was based on the realization that men are not angels. The Federalist Papers were honest enough to admit, “If men were angels, no government would be necessary” (Hamilton, Madison, & Jay, 2008, p. 207). Admitting the truth, allowed them to create a system that held the President to certain standards and acknowledged that man is not perfect. Although they created a system that works with imperfection, they believed ethics to be necessary and included recommended virtues to help guide the direction for future leaders. These lists direct the path to a leader with standards and ethical character able to lead a country. Even though the list of virtues was suggestive for the future Presidents of America, it would prove beneficial to uphold these virtues for all …show more content…
No matter how small, any decision made by a leader affects the public to some degree. Today’s society ignores the fact that everyone has a public service role, not just those working in the public sector. Holding all leaders to the ethical standard developed by the Founding Fathers would help introduce consistent, good leadership. The recommended virtues decided by the Federalist Papers include: gratitude, integrity, intelligence, courage, reason, passion, ability, and fortitude. The vices are love for money, pride, vanity and excessive self-interest. Ambition was listed as a virtue and a vice. Federalist 51 discusses how dangerous ambition can be if not used correctly, “ambition must be made to counteract ambition” (Hamilton, Madison, & Jay, 2008, p.206). The Federalist Papers emphasized the importance for leaders to have a greater cause than their personal ambition. Then and only then can ambition be a virtue. Although the Federalist Papers only listed ambition to potentially be a virtue or a vice, prior research acknowledges all virtues have the potential of becoming vices if not properly backed by a strong background of values and morals. A simple example looks at

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