Injustice In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

1082 Words 4 Pages
Whenever an act of injustice occurs, it “seems [as if] only children [will] weep” (243). This familiar quote by Atticus Finch expresses the fact that only children in their youthful idealism will believe that the world is without fault while in reality, injustice happens every single day. He is referring to Jem, who cried upon hearing the verdict. No others had cried because everyone in Maycomb had grown accustomed to the prejudice and only children, with their vague understanding of good and evil react to such an occurrence. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, is a beautifully constructed novel, following the story of Scout Finch, a young girl growing up in a small Southern town inflicted by hatred and prejudice. As Scout and her brother, …show more content…
Jem is finally exposed to the prejudice in Maycomb towards people who are different. His illusions about justice and the law have been shattered by the reality of the court case. Up to this point in the book, Jem had been an innocent mockingbird. Although the forces of hatred and prejudice do not take his life, they strip him of his childhood and youthful idealism. Later, Scout wants to kill a small roly poly bug that was inside the house, but “Jem [scowls] … [saying that] ‘they don’t bother you’” (273). The events of the trial have forced Jem to grow up. Even during the trial, he had believed that evidence would be enough to exonerate Tom, but he soon finds that this is not the case. With his newfound understanding, he no longer tolerates any sort of casual cruelty and respects all life, even those of insects. On Halloween night, after the attack, Scout finally looks closely at the man who had saved her that night. She gazes “at him in wonder” and then, realizing that it is Boo Radley, says softly, “‘Hey, Boo’” (310). Though Scout begins the story being utterly terrified of Boo because of rumors and …show more content…
Scout and Jem begin the story believing rumors about Boo Radley, not understanding racism, and simply accepting the way life is in Maycomb. Even though Jem grows up much faster than Scout, by the end of the book, they both have a much more complex understanding of the world around them, as well as the people who live in this world. Once Scout and Jem are stripped of their childhood innocence, they are finally exposed to the dangers of prejudice and hatred. However, the book ends as it began, in innocence, as when one finally understands the dangers of both good and evil, one is able to retreat back into the love of one’s

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