God's Grandeur Poem Analysis

Superior Essays
In the poems “God’s Grandeur” by Hopkins, and “The Fish” by Elizabeth Banks the reader will find many similarities like the use of figurative language, diction, and theme. All these usages of rhetoric strategies help strengthen, and clarify the intent of the author.
Both poems “God’s Grandeur” by Hopkins, and “The Fish” by Elizabeth Bishop use figurative language, and imagery in order to push their message, and help the reader understand their point of view. In “God’s Grandeur”, Hopkins says “like the ooze of oil” (3), in order to somehow quantify god’s greatness. The usage of this simile is more to show that earth is just seeping around with god’s greatness like oil in the ground. Hopkins also says “like shining from shook foil;” (2) in order
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In “God’s Grandeur” Hopkin uses parallel structure to connect, relate topics, and emphasis importance. When Hopkins uses the sentence structure “And….” One can tell that it will be interconnected with the past sentence structures using “And…”. He connects lines seven, and eight in order to show the extent of damage caused by mankind’s follies. Another important use of parallelism is during line two, and three when Hopkins uses starts the phrase it in order to show the characteristics of first earth, and then god. He connects these two sentences that is important to his meaning. Hopkins also uses different word choices throughout the passage. He first starts off with phrases similar to “smeared with toil” (7) which shows a negative spin. Then throughout the passage his view slowly changes into a more of an optimistic view. When Hopkin saying “Worlds broods with warm breast, and with ah! bright wings.” (14) you can feel the optimism just radiating off of this phrase/line. In “The Fish” Elizabeth Banks uses specific diction strategies in order to more clearly pass her message, and her point along. One of the major diction use is parallelism, which is the repetition of a word or a phrase in order to emphasis. Banks use repeated like phrases in order to show the importance of those set lines. Like during line 4-6 Banks uses the sentence phrase “He…” in …show more content…
Instead of using a personal anecdote or a man’s reaction with nature, Hopkins generalizes humanities behavior in comparison to nature, and god. In order to get the theme we first must know the summary, speaker, and situation. The speaker seems to be a bystander almost as if this bystander, gender neutral, was watching over earth, and watching mankind’s progress. The poem starts off praising god, and relating his greatness with related events. After praising the speaker the goes on to relate god with nature, and then he goes on to talk about god’s all-powerful presence. He then as if he just noticed mankind he goes, and puts out their blunders. Continuing the negative view about how people are the reason for the downfall of the earth, the speaker transitions into a more optimistic approach. All of these moments came together to form the theme about natures regenerative powers, and god’s presence in nature. In “The Fish” Elizabeth Banks uses similar theme to that of “God Grandeur”, both poems show Man vs Nature. In order to discuss the theme we first have to bring in the speaker, and situation. The speaker or the narrator is presumably Elizabeth Banks Herself with her extensive background near water, and her love for the ocean, but we are never confirmed if it truly is her or not. The speaker is a gender neutral fisher whose is

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