God And The Beloved Analysis

1940 Words 8 Pages
God and the Beloved: A Journey in Understanding Love In renaissance poetry, one of the major themes is found in the correlation of god and love. The religious tradition states that these two idols are one in the same, but four poets show that the beloved can quickly steal this spotlight. Starting with Emmanuel Petrarch, we can see his painful devotion to his beloved Laura, was one of the spark’s of the renaissance era; only to be somewhat mocked by Sir Philip Sidney’s humorous remarks about love and relationships. Brining a focus on Neo-Platonic ideas, John Donne and Katherine Phillips brought an understanding between holy/metaphysical ideas and the bodily bond of the beloved, providing insight that love means being equal with the spouse. …show more content…
In sonnet 47 Petrarch beautifully describes Laura as someone who “Have made the woodlands echo with her name;” (Selections from the Canzoniere and Other Works, Sonnet 47). Petrarch 's deep love is very reluctant, and he usually ends up disregarding his passion as pain, referring to Laura as “The sighs, the tears, the languishment, the love.” (Sonnet 47). Petrarch deeply describes himself as “oppressed,” and a “Prisoner,” and even though there are traces of love through sonnet 47, sonnet 48 ONLY elaborates on Petrarch 's pain. Petrarch shows his strong devotion to god, and calls to him to “Have mercy, lord, on my long shameful yearning.” (Selections from the Canzoniere and Other Works, Sonnet 48). The priests’ “eleventh year,” (Sonnet 48), of loving Laura is described as the “unhappy day of desolation,” making it hard to see true love under his hopelessness; this conveys Petrarch’s confusion toward devotion or …show more content…
He describes these years as “sad and remorseful,” (Sonnet 316), and pleads to god to forgive him for his sins, hoping to recover from the love that wasn 't resolved. Petrarch never gives up his devotion to god, and while he admits to betraying him with his devotion to Laura, he still cries “Lord I implore thee, from this prison loose / My soul withheld eternal banishment / I know my sin and offer no excuse.” (Sonnet 316). Battling between virtue and love, Petrarch clearly picks virtue, and finds every way to discard love to save himself from this “smothered virtue,” (sonnet 316). What these sonnets show is the crippling confusion Petrarch has when choosing between god and love, a problem soon solved by a humorous

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