Hip Hop Nation Summary

Good Essays
Andy Bennett (1999) and H. Samy Alim’s (2008) articles both explore the key concept of globalization. The articles explore this concept through hip hop music and its associated culture. The authors are in agreement that hip hop began in the United States as a primarily African American art form. They share the belief that it is not solely a genre, but a culture. Bennett and Alim explore the globalization of hip hop culture and how it is adapted and appropriated in space and place.

They are suitable for comparison due to their similar focus. Both articles explore the hip hop genre and its associated culture. Hip hop is explored in relation to space, community, diaspora and identity which are all key ethnographic concepts.

Bennett explores
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He describes the way the ‘discourses and sensibilities of African American hip hop’ are translated into ‘white terms’ (Bennett 1999:8). This is significant as he describes the way that hip hop is a template for youth to attach meaning and significance (Bennett 1999:21). As a genre and a culture, it attracts ‘young people from very diverse socio-cultural backgrounds’ (Bennett …show more content…
He believes that hip hop can be used to articulate ‘race, gender, class and political position’ and can empower subjects as transnational (Alim 2008:16). He explores the ability of youth to ‘manipulate, (re)appropriate and (re)create’ parts of hip hop in order to be part of the Global Hip Hop nation (Alim 2008:4). Hip hop, while constructed on a global basis is also constructed on a local basis. Alim looks at the language of hip hop in countries such as Japan and Australia, the latter taking steps to identify more with a national identity as Australian rather than African American (Alim

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