Global Queing Examples

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Dennis Altman has described the phenomenon of the emergence of queer identities in non-western nations as “global queering” (Altman 1996). The concept of global queering relies heavily on the notion that queer identities in non-western nations are the result of the dissemination of western sexualities and gender identities into other parts of the globe (Jackson 2009). While it is certainly true that various manifestations of queerness have originated in the west and then emerged in non-western countries, queer identities unique to these nations do exist and have contributed significantly to their flourishing queer cultures. Katrin Vogel’s “The Mother, the Daughter and The Cow…” highlights the emergence of unique gender identities in Venezuela …show more content…
Though gender fluidity itself is not unique to India, the history of the third gender in India dates back to 4000 years ago (Tellis 2012). To say that the hijra are a product of western non-binary and genderqueer identities would erase the extensive history of unique gender identities in India and equate the hijra and their place in place in Indian society and culture to that of their western counterparts. Venezuela’s transformitas and India’s hijra are just a few examples of queer identities existing largely outside of western queer influence. While these gender identities have been commonly compared to what is considered to be their western counterparts, their unique histories and roles in their respective cultures make them specific to their …show more content…
The ethnocentric nature of queer terminology means that certain labels are often at odds with the vernacular of non-western regions. While the word queer is a convenient umbrella term for different gender identities and sexualities, its history as a term used by mostly white American academics contributes to the overall hegemonic nature of queer identities and discourse. In Taiwan, the local term “tongzhi” (an umbrella term similar to queer) has been somewhat eroded by western queer terminology (Welker & Cam 2006). Social activist Josephine Ho argues that adopting a universal language for queer identities is a key step in uniting queer communities across the globe (Welker & Cam 2006). While there is some truth to Ho’s claims, the adoption of a “universal” language, that in reality originated in the west, could be interpreted as a form of colonisation of non-western queer communities, therefore erasing parts of their history, culture and language (Tang

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