Georgia Voter Turnout Analysis

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Georgia voter participation and voter turnout have varied over the years. Georgia is one of the strongest opening states to require a picture ID to cast an in person ballot and make it count. Nevertheless, photo ID is not commanded to cast an absentee ticket in Georgia. A number of residents of Georgia strongly supported the voter ID law to attack fraud during the election process. On the other hand, some labeled it a Jim Crow-era that would suppress the minority votes. Georgia offered all residents of the state a free picture ID if they needed one. Briefly, after the bill was passed records from the Secretary of State’s office documented that 26,506 residents received free picture IDs. Participation between blacks and Hispanics increased …show more content…
Georgia’s African American churches have a lenthy history of political participation, containing a crucial role in the civil rights movement. These groups also have an impact on the decisions made by elected public officials in Georgia capital city. During the racial segregation time frame, preachers and educators helped serve as the head commanders of the black community in Georgia. Secondly, Georgia welfare programs, particularly child welfare services are the largest part of the human services budget. The child welfare provide for Georgia’s children and some adults that qualify for the assistance. The Georgia Food Stamp program supply monthly assistance to low income families to help pay for the cost of groceries. Georgia Medicaid program, gives health care coverage for individuals who are aged, blind, disabled, or poor. Georgia Temporary Assistance for Needy Families provides monlthy income to poverty families with kids under the age 18. Next, the Dixiecrats are members of Georgia Rights Democratic Party. The goal of the Dixiecrats was twofold. This group descriminated the insertion of a civil rights plank in the party platform. Thirdly, the Georgia Legislative Black Caucus (GLBC) established in 1975 to empower African American legislators, to structure strategies for dealing with particular legislative …show more content…
Specifically, they worked on gaining full civil rights. They were permitted the right to vote during (1941-1945) time period. Women protested for civil rights, and worked hard to change the abortion bill and get the Equal Rights Amendment approved by the Georgia legislature. White women gained the opportuntity to take a major part in the public sphere during the Civil War Era. The LBGT community fought for rights that were overlooked during the civil rights movement and significantly focused mainly on women and gay rights. Also, Atlanta’s first Gay Pride march was in 1970. Gay Pride is a sense of being worthy of honor and satisfaction in link with the public recognition of one’s own homosexuality. In addition, Georgia Affirmative Action refers to the stages taken by employers and four year colleges to increase the proportions of historically disadvantaged minority groups at those

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