George's Decision To Kill Lennie Analysis

739 Words 3 Pages
In the book Of Mice & Men, written by John Steinbeck, the novel concludes by one of the main characters, George, killing his best friend and counterpart, Lennie, after Lennie accidentally kills a young woman. I believe that George was justified in his decision to kill Lennie. Lennie was a character who caused harm and destruction throughout the book, despite not meaning to. He also prevented George from living his life because of the way George had to take care of him and nurture him, much like a child. Because of his actions in the book, Lennie would’ve been killed in an immoral way if George didn’t kill him himself. Due to these reasons, George is justified in his decision to kill Lennie. Some may argue that killing anyone is wrong, but I …show more content…
Lennie caused George to lose many jobs, and get into a lot of trouble. One example of this was in “Weed”, where George and Lennie were previously employed. In Weed, Lennie grabbed a girl’s dress and didn’t let go. This caused chaos, and George and Lennie fled. According to George, this has happened more than once in the course that he has been with Lennie. Lennie continues to kill animals as well. In the beginning of the book, Lennie is seen carrying a dead mouse, and later in the story, Lennie kills his new pup. This all shows the reader that Lennie does not know his own strength, and ultimately he ends up too strong for his own good. This was one reason George was justified to kill …show more content…
In the book, Curley claims that he will kill Lennie himself. George knows that if Curley kills Lennie, it will be cruel and he will suffer. To prevent this from happening, George kills Lennie by shooting him “between the spine and the base of the skull” (a reference to Candy’s dog), and says it should be painless and he wouldn’t even know. George was trying to prevent Lennie from hurting in the end. Many may say that George’s decision was selfish. However, due to George’s caring nature, I believe it was out of love for Lennie. George is seen caring for Lennie throughout the book, and even tells him the story about the ranch hands and the rabbits one last time to ensure he dies

Related Documents