George W Veditz Smooth Signer

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A deaf teller well known in deaf history is George W. Veditz he was born on August 13, 1861 in Baltimore, MD to German immigrants. Veditz became deaf at the age of 8 due to scarlet fever. Veditz was fluent in spoken English and German as well as many other languages. After he became Deaf he was privately tutored until about the age of 14, he enrolled at the Maryland School for the Deaf (MSD) in Frederick. The school’s principle of the Maryland School for the Deaf hired George Veditz as a private tutor and bookkeeper. Veditz wanted to enroll in Gallaudet in 1878 but he could not afford going to school there. He did everything he could to save money for his education, he was a foreman in the printing office at the Maryland School for the Deaf. …show more content…
George W. Veditz became a smooth signer because he was one of the first to film American Sign Language. George W. Veditz had strong opinions about preserving sign language. During the years he was president, he worked with Oscar Regensburg, who was the first chairman of NAD’s motion picture fund committee to produce some of the earliest films that recorded sign language. George W. Veditz and Oscar Regensburg captured a variety of people on film, including the director of Gallaudet Edward Miner Gallaudet, Robert P. McGregor, John B. Hotchkiss and Edward Allen Fay. George W. Veditz was driven by the injustices of deaf people being treated as second-class citizens, job discrimination, and repression of sign language. Veditz informed people of the violations of the rights of deaf and hard of hearing. In the early 1900s Veditz realized that newly developed technology of motion pictures were a great way to show the beauty of sign language to the rest of the …show more content…
Veditz started by making a 14-minute film without subtitles in 1913 titled “Preservation of Sign Language” due to the tragic Congress of Milan in 1880, which was to ban the use of sign language in Deaf schools across the nation. Milan voted to ban sign language, which was quickly spread the ban of sign language in education worldwide. For the last 33 years, ASL was snatched away from schools. George W. Veditz did the film “Preservation of Sign Language” by demonstrating the importance of the rights of deaf people to be able to sign. In the 20th century the NAD was concerned that “Pure sign language” might disappear under the pressure of Oralism. There was fear that American sign language would disappear completely, but Veditz and the NAD produced various of films from 1913 to 1920. Veditz wanted deaf people to use sign language as well as to obtain employment. Veditz gathered up the money to finance the recording of speeches in sign language. In his films he wanted to emphasize the beauty of American sign

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