The Impact Of Science And Technology On The English East India Company

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Both science and technology had a very profound role on the East India Company’s (EIC) rule over India, as well as added to the economy. Some background – with the EIC’s help, the British first took over areas in India starting with Bengal, located in northeast India today, and then moving down to the southern parts of India as well. They acquired some more territories in northern India after. Expansion to India eventually slowed down; however, once they stopped acquiring as much territory, they began to become much more involved in the lives of the residents of India at the time. The British started to establish the sub-continent by applying new technology with the ‘great surveys’, and applying science with the onset of steam power. Towards the end of the 1800’s, the British believed that they’d established the area and felt like they’d inserted (among Indians) the desire to be reformed. Without the presence of the East India Company, India would have struggled to develop. The English East India Company was able to add to the economy as well as govern India more effectively because of the …show more content…
Steam power had been there for sometime now; however, it was just now being applied in India to move heavy goods and people across long distances. Steam technology completely changed imperialism and networks around the entire globe. There are two different types of steam power in Colonial India – on water and on land.
The EIC had been using large steamboats to help maneuver the larger ships into the Indian harbors. They were then used to link the British outposts into the northern parts of India. Because of the location of the Ganges River and since it ran from west to east through India, it served as a ‘highway’ for steamboats to deliver troops, people, mail, etc. to much of the northern areas. (See image

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