Genghis Khan As A Hero Of The Mongol Empires

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Between 1206 and 1368, an extraordinary tribe of Central Asian nomads arose in the steppes of Mongolia to form one of the world 's largest contiguous land empires in history - the Mongol Empire. Led by Genghis Khan, the Mongols, within a span of less than 80 years, grew to encompass 24,000,000 square kilometers of the continent of Eurasia. In saying so, as part of the Mongol conquests, an approximated 30 million or more people had died. However, while his image in much of the world was shaped by these notoriously ruthless and bloodthirsty campaigns, Genghis Khan was and still is considered and celebrated as a hero all throughout Mongolia. Whereby he is seen as being the father of the Mongol Nation, who brought law, literacy, and religion to …show more content…
Whereby, the vendettas and violent struggles between the various fragmented tribes over land and status, were endemic and became a typical feature of steppes politics. In saying so, the Mongols were not much different from the other feuding tribes of the steppe; led by a type of political-military aristocracy, they too had fought each other as well as outsiders. The Mongols comprised of mostly illiterate, religiously shamanistic nomadic horsemen. However despite being among the chaos, Mongol leader, Genghis Khan, and his descendants were responsible for the stabilisation of the steppes and brought the chaos of the steppes to an end through the rise of the Mongol …show more content…
Wherein religious tolerance, from a political perspective, was essential in the consolidation of his rule and the expansion in supporters from oppressed minorities through the creation of an institution that ensured complete religious freedom, exempting all religious leaders from taxation, and from public service. The emphasis of the importance of religious tolerance is reflective of Genghis Khan’s personal perception of cultural diversity, wherein he believed that individuals had the right to exercise one’s own religious practice as they pleased without any form of discrimination. In saying so, this belief was further cemented by the codification of the Yasa. The Yasa, otherwise known as the Great Yasa, was a set of laws brought forth by Genghis Khan, in which the Mongols and other groups under his rule, must obey. Its implementation was meant to bring an atmosphere of structure and discipline to the empire’s daily functions. As opposed to other empires, where heredity and tribe determined rank and duty, the Great Yasa was a merit-based system that did not discriminate on the basis of religion or ethnic background. In saying so, the success of the Mongol Empire regarding its political and social structures can be attributed to the innovation of

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