Genesis Chapter 12 Exegesis Essay

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Introduction
This assignment is an exegesis of Genesis chapter 12. The exegesis will look at the significance of Genesis in Pentateuch. All the different events within this chapter will be discussed, in addition to the significance for the original readers. Alongside this a short summary of the context will follow.
The Pentateuch
The Pentateuch is known as the first 5 books of the Bible. The word Pentateuch derives from the Greek word Penta, meaning Five. The following quote explains the full meaning:
Christian scholars usually refer to the first five books of the Hebrew Bible as the "Pentateuch" (Greek: πεντάτευχος, "five scrolls"), a term first used in the Hellenistic Judaism of Alexandria, meaning five books, or as the Law, or Law of Moses.
The book of Genesis starts as an introduction to the five books of the Pentateuch. Genesis starts off with describing the upmost importance of God and his creations, but5 most importantly Man the finest of Gods work. Genesis 3 explains the fall of man from Gods favour stating “Did God really say you can’t eat from any tree in the garden of Eden?” This was the first landslide from man. This was the very first sin, that leads us to the ultimate judgement of the flood.
The first piece of information from Genesis 12-50 shows us who
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The awareness that Abram started his journey to Canaan with his wife Sarai and family alongside him seems to oppose verse 1 of chapter 12. In chapter 12:1, Abram leaves his father’s house to go to an unidentified land which is later identified in verse 5 as the land of Canaan and again later explained to Abram in verse 7. (Hebrew 11:8) If this was the case then the verses aren’t chronological order. The more realistic approach would have been to speak of the two stages of Abrams journey as the first from UR to Haran with his father Terah besides him and the second without his father but with his wife Sarai and their family from Haran to

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