Generational Differences: The Boomers And The Millennials

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Throughout history, generational differences have been becoming more distinct every day. Generations such as, the Boomers, who were born between 1945 and 1964, and the Millennials, who were born after 1980, which is today’s generation have showcased major contrast in social views. Both generations however, share the commonality of being the largest generations of young people. The Boomers were activists who started to fulfill their own desires, while trying to maintain their expected responsibilities to their loved ones. The Millennials are more optimistic in accomplishing more than just what’s needed and are more advanced in a technological world. Generations, such as, the Boomers and the Millennials have dissimilarity within their views in …show more content…
Simply, the institution of marriage became voluntary rather than permanent over time. Andrew Cherlin, a sociologist and demographer, has written that, “between the 1960s and '70s the divorce rate skyrocketed, correlating exactly with the first divorces at the leading edge of the boomer generation”. In the 1980’s, the rate leveled out, leaving many people to move towards new fulfilment of their emotional and sexual drives. Therefore, the Boomers have the highest divorce rate and 2nd marriages in history. In addition, their views on marriage goes beyond their own. In 1996, the Boomers had opposed gay marriage by more than two-to-one (66% to 26%). They are more conservative when it comes to heterosexual relationships. Today, they wouldn’t be the highest supporters of gay …show more content…
In the 1950’s, family dinners were an occasion to sit down with family members and enjoy a home-cooked meal. This was a time of day when the world stopped to focus entirely on family. However, in the infancy of the television, most television shows were shown later in the afternoon and into the evening. This led to the loss of priority of dining at the table with the family as dinner in front of the television became a routine. Family time became limited. Moreover, Boomers were hesitant of taking time off work to be with their family in fear of losing their position at their workforce. As a result, this led to an imbalance between work and family for the Boomers. Boomers were controlled into being workaholics to establish self-worth. Hence, their children were then planned. Family members were the primary teachers of morals and values in the

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