Generalized Anxiety Disorder Essay

1582 Words Apr 3rd, 2015 7 Pages
Case Analysis: Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

Bryan Wood

Abnormal Psychology
Professor Powell
April 14, 2015

Bryan Wood
Mr. Powell
PSY 322
April 14, 2015
Case Analysis: Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

“During a panic attack, the first thing you want to do is get out of the situation that is causing it. However, since most professors find it disrespectful to leave during class, I had to sit for an hour and half in this agonizing state…It was as if I had terminal cancer that could not be cured.” (Gregg, 2015). This account, told through the eyes of Stacy Gregg, a once anxious college student, personifies the unrelenting and paralyzing symptoms that can come along with generalized anxiety disorder (also known
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People with GAD reported with a 39% and 73% average (Pfizer, 2012). This is because, with GAD, the brain may misfire our natural fight or fight signal in situation in which there is no real threat creating more anxiety and more confusion of why the anxiety was caused in the first place (teenmentalhealth.org). It is not hard to conceptualize how this could interfere with one’s everyday activities. According to the DSM-IV for someone to be diagnosed with GAD, along with excessive worry about events lasting more than six months, they must display at least three of the following symptoms: restlessness or feeling keyed up or on edge, being easily fatigued, difficulty concentrating or mind going blank, irritability, muscle tension, or a sleep disturbance (difficulty falling or staying asleep, or restless unsatisfying sleep) (Staff, 2015). While GAD often does not occur before adolescence only one symptom has to be present in order for them to be diagnosed with the disorder. GAD can also come with some physical symptoms such as fatigue, irritability, muscle tension or muscle aches, trembling, feeling twitchy, being easily startled, trouble sleeping, sweating, nausea, diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome, and headaches (Staff, 2015). Unfortunately this can be a lifelong disorder and can develop at any stage in life, but it occurs mot often between adolescence and middle age (NIMH). Still, there are viable ways to manage and potentially

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