Israeli Commander Case Study

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The two elements of thought that most significantly challenged the Israeli commander as he executed his mission to remove settlers from the occupied territory in Gaza are Point of View and Implications and Consequences. The element of Point of View posed the greatest challenge because the commander understood both the frustration of the settlers due to his emotional and personal ties to them and the strategic goals of his government. As a result of his compassion, he was further challenged by Implications and Consequences as he desired a non-violent removal of the settlers, some that were extremely reluctant to relocate. These challenges caused the commander to struggle internally as he balanced the execution of his mission with consideration …show more content…
Additionally, he could rationally understand that relocating from the Occupied Territory was a positive way to extricate Israel from the conflict, thus decreasing its vulnerability to terrorism. Despite the fact that General Hacohen was both an intelligent and compassionate leader, he was challenged by finding the balance between the two vastly different points of view. Through his understanding of the intellectual standard of fairness, General Hacohen concluded that the rights and needs of the settlers were, in fact, considered on the same plane with the rights and needs of the Israeli population. Though the relocation was emotionally unfortunate, the government made it as fair as possible for the settlers, providing advanced notice and offering both monetary compensation and moving assistance for those who left …show more content…
His compassion and commitment to a non-violent removal of settlers’ were internalized by both his Soldiers and the settlers. His talent in the art of compromise and negotiation with settlers in respected positions of authority resulted from his consideration of their point of view. The armor and aircraft held in reserve for the possibility of heavier fighting were not deemed necessary, and thus, not utilized. In the end, as all settlers were peacefully relocated to Israel within the timeline set by General Hacohen’s chain of command. It can be concluded that General Hacohen’s ability to both recognize and prevail over his two biggest challenges – that is Point of View and Implications and Consequences – resulted in the Israeli Defense Force victoriously accomplishing their mission to remove settlers from the Occupied Territory. Though his mission caused him a degree of internal conflict, General Hacohen’s emphasis on the fair treatment of the settlers after careful consideration of the breath of their point of view produced a favorable outcome, leading to his ultimate mission

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