Isaac Asimov's Argument Of Gender Stereotypes

Decent Essays
For centuriesmany years, gender stereotypes have been used as a targets for comedic purposes, especially in the media. Television, in particular, is a large media source that displays a great amount of gender-focused humor, especially in sitcoms., Televison comedy has kept current with the changing role of the sexes over time; this can be seen by the trend away from portraying male stereotypes as positive and female stereotypes as negative (as was typical in the 1950s and 1960s, for example), to commonly doing the opposite todayand demonstrates its evolvement over the years by beginning to magnify negative male stereotypes. Similar to television, tThe Internet is another large media source that also displays a vast amount of gender-focused …show more content…
In the New York Times article titled “About Men: Male Humor,” Isaac Asimov shares what he has taken from the multiple conversations he has had with different men on the topics of women and humor. Asimov believes that most men only feel comfortable making jokes about females in the presence of other males when making jokes about females. From his own personal experience, though, Asimov has witnessed women “laugh as hard at dirty jokes as men do.” Though tThe main reason that Asimov thinks men believe that the presence of women will ruin their fun is because “one of the components of the dirty joke is unabashed male chauvinism (exaggerated or aggressive patriotism).” Asimov does not think it makes sense to get rid of male chauvinism jokes because he understands the therapeutic significance it could can have for men to use jokes as a way to get things off of their chest, but he does think that women should be able to tell their own jokes back. Unfortunately, what Asimov noticed after speaking with many women was that women they often purposelyintentionally leftave the joke-tellings to the men. The wWomen often stated how that they wished they could repeat the jokes they heard, but they never seemed to …show more content…
The change in gender roles decreased the gender divide in humor. In "The gender divide in humor: How people rate the competence, influence, and funniness of men and women by the jokes they tell and how they tell them," a journal article in the Wellesley College Digital Scholarship and Archive, Christina Rozek explains how “the notorious gender divide in humor—of men who tell jokes and of women who are expected to laugh at them—may have diminished because of women’s changing social roles” (8). Today, woman women hold much more power than they did centuries years ago, and as a result, women’s views and opinions are increasingly valued. There are also many more female main characters on television comediesy shows and many more female comedians then than in past eras, making it clear that the decrease in the gender divide in humor is correlated with the overall broadening of gender roles is correlated with the decrease in the gender divide in humor. Rozek explains that males dominated humor not because women were not capable, but because of many men’s ', “inability of the critical tradition to deal with comedy created by women. rather than the inability of women to produce comedy that accounts for the absence of critical material on the subject” (27). There are numerous females in the United States who successfully produce comedy such as Amy Schumer, Amy Poehler, and

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Not all men are the same. Much can be said about the common stereotype of man. One stereotype which is the focus of the article “Why Women Aren’t Funny” by Christopher Hitchens, is the attribute of humor. In fact he is so bold to proclaim that men are in fact funnier than women. A way in which he justifies this statement is the common thought that all women say they…

    • 854 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Euripides 's Medea is an overly dramatized anti-feminist play that borders on portraying prejudices against women as outlandish comedy. To modern readers like the ones in our Gender and Sexuality class at Lick, Medea can come across as comic, but this reaction does not mean that our society is “post-sexist”; there are definitely still many people who agree with the prejudices the play presents. But although Medea can come across as stereotypical in that Medea is the overly-emotional woman and Jason is the overly-logical man, the ancient play still exposes gender roles in a way that is recognizable today; we laugh at the ridiculousness because we are still familiar with such absurd sexism in modern society. Medea’s responses to Jason’s actions…

    • 1312 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This episode sheds a light on a serious problem in America and that is inequality between men and women. This episode has great cultural and literary value. The role of women in America has been suppressed and The Simpsons used their comedy to convey a very important message which is that women are just as smart if not more intelligent than men and should be treated as equals. By showing both Marge and Lisa getting discriminated it shows that Marge was ignored because of who she is but because she is women. Having both Lisa and Marge being shunned by men it shows what The Simpsons really think about the American society and how women have…

    • 798 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    North American Humor Essay

    • 1602 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The original hypothesis stated that men were depicted as humorous in North American sitcoms. The primary research that was conducted also concluded that men were more humorous than women in North American sitcoms. Men were seen making humorous jokes, references and gestures throughout the shows. However, there were many women making these humorous acts as well, but not many when being compared to men. This persuades society to believe that men should be humorous, even more than women.…

    • 1602 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The media gives the impression that life is full of men with a variety of sense of crisis, a single woman of nervousness and can not be due diligence of professional mothers. Postmodernists often disagree with this culture of gender discrimination. They think that we are in the age of equality between men and women, fashionable pop culture just for entertainment - "sounds like some aggressive, but does not mean that gender discrimination.” Whelehan pointed out that this view is wrong! Because of this "entertainment only" environment, attitude and language, has become part of our daily lives. Women are in fact unknowingly victims of this culture, which reflects the role of women in today 's society, which means that there is still widespread gender discrimination in society.…

    • 1398 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The setting of That 70s Show is crucial to understanding why there are so many gender stereotypes depicted in the show. This was a time where women were considered inferior to men but, this is not the case nowadays. Every character in the show fulfils some type of gender stereotype. For the male characters, some of the stereotypes are still around in our society today. As for the female characters, society has moved on from the stereotypes placed on women and accepted the fact women and men have the same capabilities in life.…

    • 767 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Contemporary satire has inserted itself into many forms of entertainment, most notably television. A multitude of comedic television shows are satirical because the genre have become favorable and trendy, and this uprising is not accidental. The millennial generation, characterized as…

    • 1632 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    With men, being perceived as powerful and women being seen as passive and dependent, the younger generations begin to believe that these figures are the norm. The violent messages given off by certain advertisements begin to be overlooked and just become absorbed in our brains. Advertisers sell their products in the ways they do, one way being the objectification of women, because it not only appeals to the male consumer, but it also appeals to the female consumer making her believe that the ideal women looks, acts, and thinks in the ways a man would want her to. The irony in this idea is that an ideal woman, which all other women are trying to be: a sexy yet innocent, thin yet nourished, beautiful and perfect individual in all reality, does not exist. Kilbourne also stated in her talk series that “women learn from an early age that they have to have a perfect figure.…

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Masculinity and misogyny also go hand in hand. Hence, there is a connection here. Femininity is a very distinct theory that is celebrated by females but shunned by males, and this notion is constantly endorsed by the media (Chu). Masculinity is a prized attitude that is strongly endorsed and expressed by the media. Lack of masculinity has a negative stigma, since it shows a weaker position in the hierarchy of men that is created by the media and society (Consalvo 30).…

    • 1363 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Roaring 20s were when the Flappers, “independent and rebellious” (Banner 578) came out to play. Flappers emerged because there was a loss of biblical authority and a general decline in traditional morals in the United States. However, even though there was such a heavy aura of feminism that masked the era, underneath that mask were the many men that were most definitely not ready to leave the Victorian life style that made them superior to the women. Flappers were similar to Jordan Baker in the sense that both were inde-pendent and free-spirited; Jordan was able to party with multiple men, dance with whomever she liked, dress however she liked, and ultimately was in control of herself in every…

    • 1328 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics