Gender Roles In The Renaissance

Decent Essays
The rebirth of a society through changing arts and ideas is a rare event, especially at the intensity and thoroughness of the Renaissance. This period of a couple hundred years was able to transform the way people lived, and introduced new art forms, artists and philosophical ideas. Though not apparent at the time, the people who lived during the Renaissance would make a profound impact on “future generations-from art and literature to education, political science, and history.” (The World Book Encyclopedia, “Renaissance”) There are many topics that can be discussed regarding this changing time, but gender roles, specifically women’s, are largely significant. Women in the Renaissance, through the organization of the Common Themes Theory, faced …show more content…
Throughout history, evident patterns can be detected amongst varying situations. One of the “methods of contemplating the development of culture and the record of history” is through the common themes theory. (Detrick, “Western Culture: Why? What? And How?”) This problem, solution and effect method is especially prominent in the lives of women throughout the Renaissance. The problems that women encountered pertained to human rights issues where equal rights were not common among the group and were difficult to obtain. While the Renaissance was viewed as a time of rebirth and new opportunities, it merely seemed advantageous to men. For example, in times when the economy was good, it was a sign of wealth if it was unnecessary for a woman to work, it demonstrated that the man was able to provide for his family without the assistance of the ‘weaker sex’. (Detrick, “The Early Renaissance”) This superior position that the …show more content…
This statement is valid for the women who were affected by the discrimination, and they were left with two choices when it came to solutions. They could either make the choice to sit and tolerate the situation or they could invent new ideas and methods to overcome the patronizing atmosphere. (Detrick, “Western Culture: Why? What? And How?”) Many women who yearned for change in their society decided that accepting the degrading treatment was not solving any problems. Of this group, some wrote books to define the strengths of the female sex and express the capabilities that they had but were unable to display in their community. Laura Cereta is an excellent example, as she “maintained a scholarly lifestyle” and felt that even women were born with a right to education. (Cunningham, et al., 360) Although she faced criticism from both men and women, she overcame the condemning attitudes of others and made sure her worth, as well as other women’s, was visible. Those who tolerated, most likely felt like there were no other options or had too much to lose if they took that risk. (Detrick, “Western Culture: Why? What? And How?”) They contributed to the bystanders who did nothing to help change the issue and equalize society. There will always be differences in how people choose to approach a problem, sometimes one proves to be better than the other

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    By saying this, the intended audience will feel emotionally indignant as they are reminded by the civil right movement and the dim result that they received from it. By feeling righteous anger, the audience will feel sympathetic with other women and feel the need to stop smiling falsely. Although her argument may sound convincing and compelling, she generalizes that all present-day women are incapable of going against societal expectation weakens her argument. In contemporary days, in my community, women challenge for their rights; these women are called feminists. They will firmly go against the will of society and eschew the negativity around them.…

    • 1407 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This was a result of some women acknowledging the fact that a man was not their superior, “your opinion is not my reality” (Maraboli). By having this mindset, women demonstrated their defiance towards society. Challenging society, however, was excruciatingly difficult. Thus, forcing women to be grateful for every amount of power that they could obtain from their, “domesticity and ancillary roles” in order to exercise as much power as they possible could “in ways that challenge certain norms” (Hall 203). With the constant feeling of depression and inadequacy, some women decided to obviate society’s gender roles entirely from their lives, “every step which she took toward reliving herself from obligations added to her strength and expansion as an individual” (Chopin 103).…

    • 1212 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Gender inequality has been about for years, and there are still people that believe that there is no such thing as gender inequality. There are also people that endorse gender inequality. Cisneros and Groover essays did not bring light to the topic cause we all knew that gender inequality is a problem, but It do serves as a motivation for those females that are going through similar situations. Cisneros essay only talks about gender inequality within her family but with Groover’s article we can see where gender inequality extends beyond families and into the communities and churches. Cisneros used all those negative situations to her advantage she could be a better person.…

    • 853 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women could not sign a contract, apply for loans or file a lawsuit without their husbands. They were granted little permission to most of what a man could do, while they were expected to perform as the major workforce of the society, taking all the low-skilled, low-cost, and “feminine” jobs. Women at that time suffered deeply from negative gender stereotyping, and were considered inferior to men. On the contrary, men could choose their occupations more freely than women. They could make their wives their assistants, or simply servants.…

    • 1101 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Mona Lisa Smile Analysis

    • 1861 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Feminism became a movement because women came together and decided they wanted to be treated differently and that they wanted to fill the void of the problem that had no name. Across the nation, college campuses are beginning to welcome thoughts of women’s rights and understand the true nature and worth of women in higher education. As social workers, becoming involved in campus wide education is essential to diminishing ideas of traditional gender roles and even the idea of gender related careers paths. In recent years, women’s centers, majors in women’s studies and feminism, and clubs and groups have formed in order to educate individuals about women’s rights and issues. By furthering the efforts of these organizations within institutes of higher education, social workers can stand from a larger platform to educate and empower young women about their true potential, regardless of what traditional society and gender roles expects from them.…

    • 1861 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    I also notice people around me, and myself affected by this mindset. An example is when girls, including me, are not assertive in class or conversation because we don’t want to seem rude. However, in reality, it is a perfectly okay thing to do, and the knowledge that it makes us seem annoying is only caused by society’s accidental hive mind (even though most people would support women not needing to meet standards, actions/habits say otherwise, causing us to all subconsciously develop ways to conform to an idea that seemingly doesn’t exist anymore; basically, if you asked someone, they can say that they do not think assertive women are annoying/bossy, but if actually faced with one, they might subconsciously reject them for reasons they don't even realize) where it seems more acceptable to be quiet. Since generally everyone is a part of society, girls might think that it’s normal to be docile and let boys take up more space. These behavior makes them have less self-worth and ‘power’ than boys, even though they don't know it, and never knew any different.…

    • 1241 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Jane Eyre recognizes the inequality that women face in her society and fights for acceptance and independence. Jane refuses to be tied down to a loveless marriage like other women, desires to be able to fully express herself and only finds true happiness once she and Rochester have a balance of power and she can have independence. Jane gains a strong moral compass from her female role models like Miss Temple and Helen by learning to resemble them. Before attending Lowood, Jane does not have a good role model to follow,…

    • 853 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    She does so because the letter has taught her so much, and removing it unnaturally would not be right. Hawthorne states, “Some attribute had departed from her, the permanence of which had been essential to keep her a woman.” Despite her rather permanent separation from society, she learns it is not always best to go with the crowd, and her own beliefs are more important than a whole, static public opinion. As Hester learns, individuality is the sole way to discover one’s true…

    • 834 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    So, women did not have much option to prove themselves in the society. Education was seen as a negative impact on ladies in olden days as a fact that it enabled them against their disparities. Joe specifically expresses the real issue in the novel saying that it is harder for any lady who is been to college. She gets the thought she has a psyche, her teachers pay consideration on what she needs to say, they treat her like a reasoning person when she gets hitched, her center gets attacked (Atwood 276). The way Atwood shows this is through Marian's association with Peter.…

    • 1280 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    I had an opinion on her being exposed to too much propaganda coming from the society, which I had expressed to her a couple of times, but unfortunately, she usually brushed it off. She still believed everything. She believed that women weren’t good enough, smart enough, cool enough, and every time I would tell her that they in fact were, she kept silent. We didn’t argue a whole lot; every now and then there would be an argument that was, of course, caused by me, when she would doubt herself or not want to play tag with me because “girls are supposed to be calm and careful”, but I was understanding. And so was she.…

    • 1715 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays