Gender Roles In The Renaissance

1066 Words 5 Pages
The rebirth of a society through changing arts and ideas is a rare event, especially at the intensity and thoroughness of the Renaissance. This period of a couple hundred years was able to transform the way people lived, and introduced new art forms, artists and philosophical ideas. Though not apparent at the time, the people who lived during the Renaissance would make a profound impact on “future generations-from art and literature to education, political science, and history.” (The World Book Encyclopedia, “Renaissance”) There are many topics that can be discussed regarding this changing time, but gender roles, specifically women’s, are largely significant. Women in the Renaissance, through the organization of the Common Themes Theory, faced …show more content…
Throughout history, evident patterns can be detected amongst varying situations. One of the “methods of contemplating the development of culture and the record of history” is through the common themes theory. (Detrick, “Western Culture: Why? What? And How?”) This problem, solution and effect method is especially prominent in the lives of women throughout the Renaissance. The problems that women encountered pertained to human rights issues where equal rights were not common among the group and were difficult to obtain. While the Renaissance was viewed as a time of rebirth and new opportunities, it merely seemed advantageous to men. For example, in times when the economy was good, it was a sign of wealth if it was unnecessary for a woman to work, it demonstrated that the man was able to provide for his family without the assistance of the ‘weaker sex’. (Detrick, “The Early Renaissance”) This superior position that the …show more content…
This statement is valid for the women who were affected by the discrimination, and they were left with two choices when it came to solutions. They could either make the choice to sit and tolerate the situation or they could invent new ideas and methods to overcome the patronizing atmosphere. (Detrick, “Western Culture: Why? What? And How?”) Many women who yearned for change in their society decided that accepting the degrading treatment was not solving any problems. Of this group, some wrote books to define the strengths of the female sex and express the capabilities that they had but were unable to display in their community. Laura Cereta is an excellent example, as she “maintained a scholarly lifestyle” and felt that even women were born with a right to education. (Cunningham, et al., 360) Although she faced criticism from both men and women, she overcame the condemning attitudes of others and made sure her worth, as well as other women’s, was visible. Those who tolerated, most likely felt like there were no other options or had too much to lose if they took that risk. (Detrick, “Western Culture: Why? What? And How?”) They contributed to the bystanders who did nothing to help change the issue and equalize society. There will always be differences in how people choose to approach a problem, sometimes one proves to be better than the other

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