Gender Roles In The 1920's

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In America the 1920’s is known, as The Roaring Twenties, an era of significant economic growth, cultural, political, and social change in. It was a time of prosperity due to the dooming automobile and manufacturing industries. Americans began to seek individual independence and challenge traditional values. However, the nation witnessed negative aspects of the 1920’s with the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan. The Ku Klux Klan used their power and violence to manipulate state and local politics to target: immigrates, Jews, Catholics, and African Americans. This era was also faced with a number of political scandals; for example, the Teapot Dome sandal exposed corruption and bribery of government officials during the administration of President …show more content…
The 1920s Flappers represented the modern women, a more independent and confident women. The flapper’s feminist movement empowered women to participate in the work force, politics, and social developments of the era. The number of workingwomen increased by 25% while maintaining household responsibilities during the 1920s. Females began to enjoy the freedoms that men enjoyed such as dancing, smoking, drinking, and etc. Women were less submissive housewives and expressing their sexuality in public places. Meanwhile, consumer culture advertised and glamorized female sexual expression in movies, magazines, fashion, and radio. The divorce rate rose, as a result of, the increased feminization, women were free to pursue multiple sexual relationships. During the Roaring Twenties women’s fashion changed dramatically. The flappers attire was much more revealing, rejecting the Victorian fashion. Women’s skirts were shorter and rose to the knees, dresses were designed in a looser straight style, the hair was cut into Bods, and makeup was used to enhance female’s facial features. The flapper persona encouraged women to reject social constraints and adopt more liberal attitudes, which women …show more content…
The National American Woman’s Suffrage Association used traditional tactics such as: suffrage parades, publishing pamphlets and books, rallies, and protest. In contrast, The National Woman’s Party radical tactics and strategies included hunger strikes, civil disobedience, jail sentences, parades, petitions, picketing, street speaking, and demonstration. The National Women’s Party sought to attract the attention of the general public using this publicity to pressure government officials to support women’s suffrage. During their campaign the NWP would use local newspapers to publicized suffrage events. The NAWSA feared that the militant tactics of the NWP organization would turn political support away from the suffrage movement. When in fact, the NWP gained public support after discovering that jailed members of the NWP went on and hunger strike and were violently force-fed by guards. News of the women’s treatment in jail along with stories of the hunger strike reached newspapers gaining the women public support and support. In 1918, President Wilson publicly announced that he support the suffrage

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