Gender Roles In The 1920's

Superior Essays
In America the 1920’s is known, as The Roaring Twenties, an era of significant economic growth, cultural, political, and social change in. It was a time of prosperity due to the dooming automobile and manufacturing industries. Americans began to seek individual independence and challenge traditional values. However, the nation witnessed negative aspects of the 1920’s with the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan. The Ku Klux Klan used their power and violence to manipulate state and local politics to target: immigrates, Jews, Catholics, and African Americans. This era was also faced with a number of political scandals; for example, the Teapot Dome sandal exposed corruption and bribery of government officials during the administration of President …show more content…
The 1920s Flappers represented the modern women, a more independent and confident women. The flapper’s feminist movement empowered women to participate in the work force, politics, and social developments of the era. The number of workingwomen increased by 25% while maintaining household responsibilities during the 1920s. Females began to enjoy the freedoms that men enjoyed such as dancing, smoking, drinking, and etc. Women were less submissive housewives and expressing their sexuality in public places. Meanwhile, consumer culture advertised and glamorized female sexual expression in movies, magazines, fashion, and radio. The divorce rate rose, as a result of, the increased feminization, women were free to pursue multiple sexual relationships. During the Roaring Twenties women’s fashion changed dramatically. The flappers attire was much more revealing, rejecting the Victorian fashion. Women’s skirts were shorter and rose to the knees, dresses were designed in a looser straight style, the hair was cut into Bods, and makeup was used to enhance female’s facial features. The flapper persona encouraged women to reject social constraints and adopt more liberal attitudes, which women …show more content…
The National American Woman’s Suffrage Association used traditional tactics such as: suffrage parades, publishing pamphlets and books, rallies, and protest. In contrast, The National Woman’s Party radical tactics and strategies included hunger strikes, civil disobedience, jail sentences, parades, petitions, picketing, street speaking, and demonstration. The National Women’s Party sought to attract the attention of the general public using this publicity to pressure government officials to support women’s suffrage. During their campaign the NWP would use local newspapers to publicized suffrage events. The NAWSA feared that the militant tactics of the NWP organization would turn political support away from the suffrage movement. When in fact, the NWP gained public support after discovering that jailed members of the NWP went on and hunger strike and were violently force-fed by guards. News of the women’s treatment in jail along with stories of the hunger strike reached newspapers gaining the women public support and support. In 1918, President Wilson publicly announced that he support the suffrage

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Girls who followed the flapper lifestyle began to publicly drink, smoke, and dance. The most radical change was the shift in sexuality and relationships. Unlike the past, women began taking charge of their own sexuality. Prior to the era, women were expected to live moral lives, staying abstinent until marriage. However, the deaths of approximately 126,00 men during World War I left many women in fear that they wouldn’t marry and would die a spinster.…

    • 1503 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The author of Flapper Fashion In the Context of Cultural Changes of America in the 1920s stated, “Drinking and smoking became symbols of young culture” (Park). Established above is evidence that fashion has the ability to change civilizations perception of acceptable behavior. As a nation, people started to accept the increasing display of women’s legs. This change in societal opinion is seen in the following lines, “At the beginning of the decade it was considered risque for a woman to reveal her legs to society, however, by the end of the decade it was acceptable for women to wear dresses and skirts which revealed their legs” (Harrison). The changes explained above show the increasing freedom and acceptance of America as a whole.…

    • 1473 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As the fight for women 's suffrage continued, the fight was also brought into the prisons. Woman who were sent to prison protested through hunger strikes as they were being denied of ‘political prisoner status’. The government 's responded by tempting the prisoners with decadent and delicious food. With the reason of, if the prisoners died due to the hunger strikes the government had the fear of the women becoming martyrs, making the Suffragette’s campaign stronger. Of Course this did not work and the government responded with the barbaric and brutal solution of force feeding.…

    • 1349 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Flapper Book Review

    • 791 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Flapper : A Mad Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity, and The Women Who Made America Modern by Joshua Zeitz analyzes the people who developed the image of flapper. This book is an inside look of 1920’s. It is an indication of a complete change in American culture. Flappers were the new woman who were claiming her rights to date, work, drink alcohol, smoke, dance, and to get free from the social norms. Joshua Zeitz states “the flapper was not a dramatic change from traditional american values but reflected the modern decades under mass media, consumerism, and celebrity.” Zeitz gives intuition into the many women who created the image of the flapper which includes Zelda Fitzgerald ( wife of Scott Fitzgerald), Coco Chanel ( a French fashion designer), and Lois Long( the writer of the New Yorker).…

    • 791 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Flappers helped redefine the role of women at a large extent. Flappers began to become more independent and obtained more freedom that allowed them to enjoy themselves and not be restricted by the economic, political, and social limits. Flappers began to have an impact on the workplace by increasing work outside of homes. Some flappers were also supporters of women 's rights as well as voting. Flappers clinged to new concepts while they rid themselves of older ideas about the role of women.…

    • 1491 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    in 1913. They were trying to wake not only politicians, but other women to how important suffrage was for women of all walks of life. Unfortunately what started off as a calm event to raise awareness and funds turned to violence. Although there was violence due to the unwilling ness of the police to protect and the anger of some citizens it did gain new sympathies that would work in its favor. Alike the movie Inez Milholland did in fact ride the white horse at the beginning of the parade.…

    • 1130 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    1920’s Womens Fashion The 1920’s was an era of “New Modernization,” going from post war stress, to parties and fun! This era was specially focused on women, and the big role they took as they became more “independent” and “carefree” about their fashion choices. Women’s fashion wasn’t just about the clothes, but about the way it made women’s confidence and power rise. To wear the most popular trends was power, as they were affordable for all women. The popular trends at this time were lighter and shorter dresses made of silk, this made the use of cotton become less popular.…

    • 1242 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    After being heavily involved with the war by providing aid by being nurses and cooks, many women demanded more representation within society. The suffrage movement was finally won on August 18th 1920, creating a major step for women’s equality. Also, starting in the 1920s, groups of women called Flappers were popping up in major cities. These women were described as, “brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms” (wiki). Young women rebelled against conservative norms by dressing in clothing that publicly expressed their sexuality.…

    • 2223 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    The new morality was a tremendous change in how women behaved. The new morality glorified personal freedom and influenced several aspects of American society. Women began to work outside the home, make their own money, and even attend college. Women 's fashion changed enormously, as they began to admire the youthful look of the celebrities of the time. Automobiles were also on the rise, and they encouraged the new morality by making the nation 's youth much more independent.…

    • 1486 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Women In The 1920s

    • 1374 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Flappers symbolized a “new freedom for women.” Most flappers defied the demeanor of women considering they began to smoke, drink alcohol, dress scandalously, and engage in sexual activities (Benner). Flappers were known to speak their mind. They were very bold compared to the modern woman (“The 1920s- Women”). Due to these changing behaviors in women, the divorce rate increased twofold in America the 1920s (“Women in the 1920s”). Jazz music was popular during this era.…

    • 1374 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays