Gender Roles In Disney Monopoly

1425 Words 6 Pages
Since a young age, women and men are exposed to gender roles. In the documentary, Disney Monopoly, they discuss how young girls see princesses being saved by princes and it makes them think they need a prince charming to save them. Humans learn to act by imitating others, the behavior we “[take] for granted is shaped by social structures” (Anderson). If these gender boxes are rooted since a young age, it is no surprise they stick with people for the rest of their lives. Gender socialization exists even at gyms. Young girls are brought up having barbies and wearing dresses; meanwhile, boys learn to “take it like a man”. Society tells woman they cannot lift weights because they need to be petite The idea that girls are “fragile” can be seen …show more content…
In “Sociology: The Essentials”, Anderson discusses how sports act as agents of socialization. According to Anderson, “sports are considered to be where one learns to be a man”, perhaps this explains why there was twenty males and only two females in the weight lifting room. Lifting heavy objects is seen as the macho thing to do at the gym. Women are discouraged from building muscle, society labels them as “butches” and society will ridicule them for “not being womanly enough” (Anderson). We live in a society where woman are expected to have a perfect body. Everywhere we look, television, magazine covers, ads, these models have unrealistic body types. None of them have defined arm muscles, they tend to be stick figure skinny. The result of the media playing such a huge role in self-image, is it influences what activities women do in a recreational center. The first floor met my expectations, more male’s workout in the first floor because their gender role is to be strong, tough, and protective and they do so by lifting. I saw a male guy take a Snapchat of his workout screen results. I was on the machine next to him so I saw when he hit “post to my Snapchat story”. He most likely did this to fit his gender box and seem strong to his male friends and attractive to his female friends. Males stick to their social …show more content…
There are written and unwritten rules that people follow. An unwritten rule at the gym is to wipe down equipment after use. Out of twenty males and two females, I saw one male wipe down his machine. When I went again later that day, I saw two males wipe down their equipment. This is not to say females do not clean after themselves, but in the moments I was present I only saw men do this act. There are also norms for clothing varying on gender. On average, younger males wore looser clothing with the exception of a few in tight shirts. Older men wore tighter fitting clothing. Women are sexualized in television, ads, and magazines. In reading my textbook, I came across a quote that really stood out to me. It goes as following, the “sexualization of women is so extensive in the media that the American Psychological Association has concluded…girls [are taught] women are sexual objects” (Anderson). Young girls, as young as nine, grow up feeling pressured to be sexy according to Sext It Up, a video we watched in class. It is then no surprise that woman continue to feel pressured to look good all of the time. After having a few discussions in class about what women wear to the gym, I focused on women apparel. More women were in matching outfits consisting of sport bras with tight leggings. A few girls wore makeup, but that does not mean they put it on specifically for the gym. On average, most girls did not have makeup on, which I was pleased about, because

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