Gender Issues In Uganda

Improved Essays
Uganda is a developing country located in Sub-Saharan Africa. Its population is about 37 million people and more than 60% of the population consists of women (Geography Uganda). The country’s average literacy rate is only 64 percent and the average literacy rate for women is 62% (Geography Uganda). Many women are not able to go to school full time because of family responsibilities and many of them have to become prostitutes in order to pay for secondary education (Kyoheirwe 136). In Uganda, there are many gender issues specifically regarding women that are not addressed by the government or any citizens. This paper analyzes the gender educational problems in Uganda that women are constantly faced with on a daily basis. The social and economic …show more content…
This lack of education contributes to the widespread of poverty in Uganda, which is due to limited resources and poorly trained teachers. School is the most demanding and most stressful financial issue for families. Primary education is free but unfortunately secondary education is not. The cost of education includes books, uniforms, work equipment and a flat rate of tuition (Hayhurst 167). Most females are heads of households at young ages, and they must support the household and school tuition by working. If this is not the case, most of the time parents who drink alcohol consume a great deal of the family income (Jones 4). This behavior forces parents to make a difficult decision on whether or not they should keep their children in …show more content…
This requirement will allow girls to be educated enough to make career choices for the next step in their life. As a popular saying goes, “Education is the Key to Success”. According to the Ugandan Ministry of Education, “One in 10 schoolgirls miss classes or drop out completely due to their menstruation periods and substitute pads for less safe and absorbent materials such as rags” (Natukunda 1). Therefore, the government should also create a regulation requiring parents to get involved in their daughters’ education. In Uganda, the government should also fund all secondary education to facilitate the education process for girls. Ultimately, these types of measures will help address this alarming drop out rate among girls, which in the long run will help solve the issues related to

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    It is very important that every female in developing countries is offered an education because it enables them to branch out of the ongoing cycle of women rights negation and gives them equal opportunity for autonomy. In patriarchal and tribal societies, most women lack education due to the norms of family and society that forbids women from their rights. According to Ziauddin Yousafzai in his Ted film, “My Daughter, Malala,” the negation of women rights in developing countries is a vicious cycle that goes on and on through generations because of the way women have been taught obedience (Yousafzai 4:44). They are taught to obey the decisions of their parents and elders at all times even if it is not in their interest to do so. Females are brutally punished for disobeying…

    • 782 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Strengths Of Feminism

    • 2079 Words
    • 8 Pages

    These female head teachers can be positive role models to the female pupils; showing them to strive for their goals instead of growing up and becoming a housewife. Girls and young women are changing their ambitions due to the feminist movement. Sue Sharpe (1976) conducted a study and researched the attitudes of girls towards their ambitions in London schools. In 1976, the results of her content analysis showed that the girls were focused on marriage and motherhood once they had finished school. One female pupil stated that ‘I think men should [have careers].…

    • 2079 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Marian Wright Edelman, an activist for the rights of children, stated, “Education is for improving the lives of other and for leaving your community and world better than you found it” (“African American Quotes”). This is very true for sub-Saharan Africa, if they had the tools necessary to learn their situations could improve majorly. They can learn things to help and modernize their communities as well. There are 33 million elementary-aged children in Sub-Saharan Africa are unable to get an education, and 18 million of those kids are girls (“Facts On Education”). If they do not go to school they do not have a chance at learning anything to help them.…

    • 1536 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In his book, Creating Room to Read, John Wood discusses the scarcity of educational opportunities for girls. He states that two hundred million girls and women all over the world do not attend school (Wood 21). It is startling that something so many people take for granted, education, is considered a luxury to girls in other areas of the world. This is a major injustice and raises the question of how to solve this issue. The lack of academic opportunities for girls is a problem that can be solved by advocating for and allocating resources to the advancement of educational opportunities for girls.…

    • 1050 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    With these policies implemented, females will be more represented and schools and narrow the gender gap between males and females and increase the enrollment rate of females in schools. Richard Maclure and Myriam Denov stated how “a policy of rapid post-war educational expansion, with its emphasis on increased girls’ access to schooling”, will no longer support “the diminishing systemic discrimination against girls and women”, and how “preoccupation with rapid school expansion is far more likely to reinforce a deeply structured patriarchal social system that perpetuates female subservience at local and national levels” (Maclure and Denov). Women can benefit from these measures in that these policies will be promoting/encouraging them to obtain the education they desire and help break them out of the cultural norm of being pushed on the back burner and seen as non-important to actually living a life they would want to live with no outside party interfering. Another approach that can be taken to improve the level of gender development in the country is to lower costs of education/make it affordable for the specific families who just can’t afford it or those who are simply excluded from education due to economic reasons. Since one major reasoning of why females were not…

    • 1758 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Cesar Chavez Analysis

    • 860 Words
    • 4 Pages

    She made a petition, spoke to many leaders and girls across the world, wrote books, and helped open schools for girls who want to further their education. (Malala Fund) Malala made a difference by having courage and speaking her mind on the issues regarding her education. She showed great persistence by not giving in, even when her whole life got turned around. Malala has fought for educational rights starting from a young age, because in Pakistan, the Taliban stopped allowing girls to go to school. Because of this, Malala started to speak out against this issue and encouraged other women to do so as well.…

    • 860 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Florence Kelley created conditions for legislative abolishment of unregulated child labor and better pay for not only women and children but all citizens (“Florence Kelley,” 2003). This was one of the main achievements that Florence Kelley had accomplished that is still in use today. Florence Kelley’s many preparations led to her achieving better work hours, wages, and conditions for women and children. Through her research, Florence Kelley published leaflets and persuaded many states to pass laws restricting the number of hours women worked (Baughman, 1998). Without the influence of Florence Kelley, many women today would still have bad paying jobs with terrible working conditions and long work hours/days.…

    • 998 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Poverty In Lean On Me

    • 2022 Words
    • 8 Pages

    This is caused by the hardships and stressors that come with being an educator such as the extremely long days and less than stable salary. This has also caused ineffective teachers to still be teaching and doing more harm than good because the “good” teachers are looking for either administration positions or different careers where they are able to support their family. Further understanding the theme of poverty in urban education could lead to some changes. However, according to the 2014 census there were 46.7 million people in poverty. Different people have looked at the issue in different ways, but there is nothing being…

    • 2022 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Poverty is one of the main sources of illiteracy. Many parents are struggling to feed, cloth and shelter themselves and their children. They considerer education as luxury; so they do not believe that education is meant for their children. This believes is what their forefathers had about education, some think education is mare what of time. Most of the insecurity problem we have is the result of children who have been left out of school.…

    • 1360 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Child Labour In India

    • 1013 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Teachers are one of the highest paying jobs in India, because of that people who are not educated enough to be teachers apply for the job and sometimes end up getting the job. If these uneducated people get the job the children in the classroom won 't learn what they need to learn. This especially happens in the private schools because no one pays attention to them. On the other hand the private schools are run by the government so they have control over what they teach but hardly pay attention to it. Since the government doesn’t pay attention to what the children are learning, 60 percent of children can’t read after going to school for three years.…

    • 1013 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays