Gender Issues In Tough Guise 2

1556 Words 7 Pages
The film Tough Guise 2 opens a unique perspective on gender topics that often seems to go unaddressed in society, referring to the violent masculinity crisis. Jackson Katz narrates the film in an effort to explain the relationship between violent masculinity and various media sources, such as video games, film, television (both shows and news channels), pornography, sports, and social media. The media has a way of normalizing and sensationalizing violence and crime particularly for young males, this is done through the media’s portrayal of what it means to a “real” man. Essentially, Katz suggests that in these harmful representations of “strong” or “real” men, these characters assert their dominance by resorting to violent tactics. Violence …show more content…
In contrast, human rights protests may be reported as riots whether they are violent gatherings or not. When females act violent towards other females, these issues suddenly had the notion of gender attributed to the act. When someone of another race or religion commits a violent act, it’s regarded as terrorism or in some cases gang violence. There are countless examples that can be used to show the disparities between new reports involving white male violence and other acts of violence. News reports aren’t the only ways in which minority groups are misrepresented. There have been many misrepresentations of minority groups and various cultures in film as well, which Katz haThe film Tough Guise 2 opens a unique perspective on gender topics that often seems to go unaddressed in society, referring to the violent masculinity crisis. Jackson Katz narrates the film in an effort to explain the relationship between violent masculinity and various media sources, such as video games, film, television (both shows and news channels), pornography, sports, and social media. The media has a way of normalizing and sensationalizing violence and crime particularly for young males, this is done through the media’s portrayal of what it means to a “real” man. Essentially, Katz suggests that in these harmful representations of “strong” or “real” men, these characters assert their dominance by resorting to violent tactics. Violence is often demonstrated in order to avoid the shame that males face when they appear “feminine” or

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