The Three Dimensions Of Gender Identity

Gender creates a demarcation between men and women which is explicitly evident from wearing different kinds of shoes and clothes to using separate toilets (Connell, 2006). The concept of gender begins with sex but goes beyond it. Sex is dependent on the chromosomes that are passed on from the parents to an offspring and determine whether the person is male or female. Gender, on the other hand, has little to do with the genitals and describes the level of masculinity or femininity in a person. This complex idea is a combination of body, identity, and expression. A congruity between the three dimensions controls a person's sense of comfort with their gender. Gender identity, one's personal experience of one's own gender, differs from the gender …show more content…
Their opportunities and life choices are dynamically impacted by it. It also affects the kind of roles they play within social institutions, be it in a household or state. Gender not only shapes the identities and behaviors of individual people but also influences their social world, social relations, social interactions and social institutions. It refers to the cultural difference between women and men. Gender attends to the way human society deals with human bodies, and the effect of it on an individual's personal life and the society's collective fate (Connell, 2006). The human body is subject to personal agency and social forces. Individuals can choose to construct and reconstruct their bodies. It has been noted over many generations that gender is always in a flux. As social, legal and technological changes continue to impact social values, these changes can be seen in families. Gender is also described as a social structure; a higher order category that society uses to organize …show more content…
Primary socialization being the foundation begins at home in early childhood. One's family is responsible for developing an individual's character by inculcating language, values, beliefs, religion, and culture in them. Secondary socialization, on the other hand, goes beyond the family setting into the outside world and continues throughout life. A person's environment including their friends and educational institutes cater the further development of their personality (Wharton, 2012). There are various theories proposed for the concept of socialization. Role learning being one of them, refers to the social facts and institutionalized templates that we take on and internalize. Another one is symbolic interaction in which an individual's identity is constantly evolving. The meaning of roles is negotiated in the context of the interaction an individual is a part of. Psychoanalysis theory uses the unconscious forces to explain human behavior. As part of this theory, Freud used the division of the mind into id, ego, and superego. Alfred Adler also talked about inferiority complex, power, recognition, and sense of belonging. Furthermore, Klaus Hurrelman proposed the theory "The Model of Productive Processing of Reality (PPR)" in his book "Social Structure and Personality Development". This theory talks about the impact of socialization on the personality of an

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