Gender Equality In The 1960's

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The 1960s was a time of great change in America; controversial problems were being addressed and rights were being fought for. A topic that was being brought up by the general population of women was the issue of gender inequality. Women realized the level of inequality, they faced and started to fight back. Through a series of protests and speeches, women began to gain their equality in many different aspects of life. The feminist movement of the 1960s in the United States helped women politically, economically, and socially but not to the extent that it should have.
Women have faced various political problems in the United States. Women have been faced with two major political problems: an unbalanced representation of women in politics and
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The idea of the typical woman was prevalent in society. Women were expected to stay at home and take care of the home. They had to stay at home, raise the children, clean, cook, and do whatever their husbands told them to do. Women are still expected to do this in some rural parts of the country, but the majority of the population does not have to deal with these expectations. In the nineteen sixties women were considered to be inferior to men and therefore had to do everything that they requested. The feminist movement changed this view of women, but because the United States still has a patriarchal society it is still an issue. A major social issue that created controversy was educational rights. Women did not have the same educational opportunities as men. This has greatly improved in the United States, but it is still an issue in other countries.
The feminist movement of the 1960s has helped women in these three aspects: politically, economically, and socially. The downside is that it mostly helped white women and not women of minorities. This is important to understand because it demonstrates where improvements need to be

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