Gender Discrimination In Education

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However, almost all the challenges faced by female, no matter what stage they are in the education system can be ultimately attributed to the gender discrimination. The unfair division between sexes and the inferior stereotype about female could be clearly seen in the challenges that had been discussed. As Gross and Davis (2013) discussed in their book:” The division is so powerful, to the extent that it generates physical and mental changes in the biological evolution of the group (Lorber, 1994 ) and in the entire social structure (Starr Sered, 2000 ) . That is why comprehensive reference to the gender perspective is not limited to the basic level of “man” and “woman” but includes all existential categories that play a role in structuring …show more content…
Therefore women were seen as an attachment of men rather than an independent society group, and they should have neither entered the academic area that was dominated by male like science, or outperformed male in any academic area. That is why Aiston (2006) quoted the view from those patriarchal that “women have not the capacity for the pursuit of learning for its own sake, and so should be removed from the university” to illustrate the ridicule of women’s ability during that time period. Sun (2012) also mentioned about the K. Millett and her idea of Patriarchy, which explained the roiling of men and the traditional identity of women as second-class citizen in the …show more content…
Several literatures have provided support for this, Bush (2005) wrote, “resistance to women’s full admission to the ancient universities was largely due to concern over the threat this posed to masculine traditions of British ruling-class education: ‘the men opponents thought that it spoilt their university if women were members’”, and Watts (2012) wrote, “ Modern military, administrative, professional and economic needs motivated nation states to fund secondary schooling for boys, but girls’ education was rarely considered.” It is true that this kind of male priority has been alleviated largely through the feminist revolution, but according to Ringrose (2007), there has been a recent claim that “ girls have reached unparalleled levels of success and feminist interventions into schooling have been met, and may have gone ‘too far’, so that girls’ achievements are continuously positioned as won at the expense of boys (Arnot et al, 1999; Francis, 2005) “. The claim rose because of the girls’ superior educational achievements as compared to boys in these few

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