Gender And The Paradox Of Residential Education In Carrier Society

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There was a strong affiliation between education, social protest, and the search for reform in rural Canada during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The readings from the fourth to eighth week of this course explore the ways in which various peoples used education to both encourage and resist change and reform in rural Canada. The readings outline the ways in which educational reform resulted in either: I) the creation of special rural institutions as a way of providing educational for the “masses” and encouraging the equality of education, II) or resulted in the creation of institutions, such as Residential Schools, where those who did not “fit-in” were forced to comply with the norms of the “urban society” creating instead an inequality …show more content…
Her article focuses on the Carrier society in central British Columbia and the contradictory outcomes of formal colonial schooling in the Lejac residential School between 1922 and 1984. Her analysis of gender education focuses on the various political factors that shaped women’s strategies of survival and social mobility including: the practices of colonized education as experienced by the Carrier; the historical transformation of family organizations and female roles; and the sexual politics of the …show more content…
As she argued, “formal education provided the skills necessary for women’s political participation, while traditional Carrier values, encourages their emergence in the public and political realm.” Ironically, this form of educational reform through colonial powers in fact liberated the Carrier women, rather than leading to assimilation and compliance. Fiske’s article reviews the ways in which social reform through colonial systems of education provided Carrier women with domestic skills, the use of new technology, and also allowed women to be more politically active. Altogether, educational reform provided by residential schools created paradoxical constraints and opportunities for women, and instead served to enhance women’s

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