Gender And Gender Stereotypes In Suffragettes In The City

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Gender is the social and cultural defining between male and female. Each individual makes a distinction of identifying as one, both, or neither. Society sees men as dominant, strong, and emotionless. Society sees women as submissive, vulnerable, vulnerable, and emotional. These archetypes of the two genders are perpetuated by culture. The culture of where one lives influences their decisions and views. The media also plays a role in this perpetuation. The media establish the stereotypes of men and women and influences our thoughts about them through their portrayal. In the comic of Suffragettes in the City, the women desire the right to vote. The women need equality. The comic shows them as disorganized, distracted, and confused. In the opinion …show more content…
She wants to text an emoji that is befitting of her achievement. She becomes confused about why there isn’t an emoji which depicts a powerful or intelligent woman. These two texts describe how the media misrepresents the female gender and that the media’s portrayal of women is inaccurate. The first text is the comic Suffragettes in the City, is a satire on the stereotypes of women and how they are represented in the media. The women in the comic are petitioning the right to vote. The comic starts with a woman demanding a man give them his vote for their petition. She then tries to persuade him with a pat on his butt. The next panel is about two men, watching the women. One man says the women are acting scandalous. The other man says that he thinks the votes are a euphemism for sexual pleasures. The women are depicted as being more fluid in the drawing style than the men. This makes them seem weaker. The men are drawn sharply and standing in proud or powerful positions. In the next four panels the women panic about how to get the votes for their right to vote. Only one woman stands out by trying to calm the other women down to get the men to take them seriously, then another …show more content…
Butcher uses the emoji version of the “We Can Do It” campaign for women in World War II, by showing a picture of a smirking emoji in a bandana flexing its arm. The speech tells a story about Butcher’s friend who had received a tenure. Butcher wanted to congratulate her friend by sending her emojis. She used a unicorn because of the immediate thought that it was amazing for her to get the tenure. However, it comes across her mind that she used the unicorn because her friend is a rare majestic creature who has received this amazing opportunity. A tenure is a permanent position for teachers or professors. There are depictions of women in emojis as dancers, brides, princesses, etc. There are no depictions of women being doctors, lawyers, or accountants. However, the emojis that depict men are police officers, construction workers, and firefighters. The stereotype of women’s standard of beauty is shown in the emojis. Although women are now the majority of breadwinners in American homes, they are still depicted as only being useful for beauty. The closest to power that Butcher found in emojis was the flamenco dancer. The flamenco dancer suggests self-assurance. She had decided that her friend was a penguin, because penguins persevere through their struggles. Butcher uses sarcasm when describing the female emojis to demean the depiction of women. She finds it offensive that the only depictions of women in the

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