Gap Between Man And Monster In Frankenstein

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British Literature Knight 3 20 March 2016 The Gap Between Man and Monster When most people think of monsters, their mind immediately wanders to images of grotesque beasts, horrid creatures, and the myths of legend. Monsters are commonly associated with inhuman physicality and emotion, and throughout history have often been characterized solely by their physical aspects. Contrary to popular belief, however, the difference between a monster and a man has nothing to do with physical qualities. A monster is not born, but is a direct result of the environment it was developed in. Monsters in literature often contain much more than what is observed by their physical description. For instance, in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Dr. Victor Frankenstein …show more content…
Both of the so called monsters are a product of a toxic environment. Mary Shelley and Oscar Wilde both use physical looks to amplify what defines a monster, however they do it in drastically different ways. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein the hideous look of Dr. Victor Frankenstein’s creation is used to show that physical appearance is not the definition of a monster. Victor’s creation is hideous and appalling to all that witness him and yet morally, he is not any worse than his creator, Victor. After the death of Victor’s mother, he became obsessive about the idea of creating life and studies tirelessly for years until he was ready to complete his task. Upon bringing his creation to life Victor describes him exclaiming, “Great God! His yellow skin scarcely covers the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing; his teeth of a pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same colour as the dun-white sockets in which they were set, his shrivelled complexion and straight black lips” (Shelley …show more content…
A few months after later, Victor receives a letter informing him that his brother has been killed. Only Victor is aware of the true culprit, however his adopted sister is convicted and executed for the murder. Because Frankenstein’s creation is responsible for the death of two of Victor’s loved ones, Victor grows to loath his creation. Later in the novel, Victor and his creation meet again and upon speaking with his creation, Victor realizes the monster is quite intelligent and has the capability to speak perfectly, read, and experience human emotion. The creation asks Victor to create a female companion for him to end his sorrow and provide someone to live out the rest of his life with in peace. Victor agrees and begins his creation but soon destroys his progress, causing his creation to vow to seek revenge. This revenge is carried out through the murder of Victor’s wife. Throughout the novel the creation causes the death of five of Victor’s loved ones, however all of the creations acts can be directly tied back to the actions of Victor and society. Victor made the conscious decision to play god and go against the way of nature, and in doing so, he causes the death of his family

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