Gangsta Rap Essay

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Gangsta rap was one of the many subgenres of rap during the ‘golden era’. This time between the late eighties and early nineties was when rap had countless artists and all were different. Whether it was black nationalism, gangs or religion itself rappers could rap about whatever they wanted and were still financially stable. Although things changed in rap when certain portrayals of black masculinity were becoming noticeably more commercially successful than others. (Randolph, 8) At first political rappers like Public Enemy and A Tribe Called Quest who talked about empowering the black community were successful but as time went on gangsta rap became the new popular genre. Gangsta rap out performed political rap because it exhibited black aggression …show more content…
Instead of rapping about the violent struggles of making money, playa rap was more about the larger than life ways to spend that money. This is when rappers would be seen wearing designer clothes like Versace and Gucci. Even in the lyrics rappers began to go out of their way to show their financial success to get girls. In Notorious B.I.G’s “One More Chance (Remix) he raps about how his clothes are able to convince women he’s worth their time when he said, “I’m clockin ya, Versace shades watchin ya/ Once ya grin, I’m in- game begin/ First I talk about how I dresses this/ In diamond necklaces- stretch Lexuses” (Randolph 12) The playa can be compared to a pimp, meaning that the pimp can use his lavish lifestyle to seduce and control women. (Randolph, 11) Instead of the lyrics comprising of violent acts and getting money illegally, the pimp is an alternative model of making money in a society that is known to be racist towards black men when it comes to legal employment. (Randolph, 11) As time went on rap as a genre began to meld together, where both gangsta rap and playa rap became one. Today if you listen to rap you will notice that rappers have been able to combine both the violent lyrics of gangsta rappers as well as the flashy lifestyle of a playa rapper. Though there is one rapper in particular who has gained popularity for his lyrics about his love of women and …show more content…
Born on October 24, 1986 in Toronto, Canada to two parents, a Jewish mother and a black father. He was raised Jewish, attending Hebrew school and had a Bar Mitzvah. He lived in the wealthy part of Toronto and pursued acting and landing a roll on the show Degrassi. He began to rap in 2006 and by 2009 he got a record deal from Lil’ Wayne’s label Young Money. Since then Drake has climbed his way to the top of the rap game by selling millions of albums, collaborating with some of the greats in hip hop, starting his own record and making millions in sponsorships with Apple and Jordan. Compared to most rappers who came from broken homes, violent neighborhoods where drugs and gangs were prevalent Drake had what can be considered a perfect life. He didn’t have the typical life experiences of some rappers like being in a gang or selling drugs. He was acting in one of the most famous teen drama shows of the 90’s so he didn’t have to sell drugs or commit a crime to get money. Also both of his parents were in his life although they got a divorce when he was young. After the divorce he lived with his mom primarily and would visit his dad in Memphis. His relationship with his mom is strong when in an interview with the Huffington Post he said, “She brought me to this point single handedly…. She’s the most important person in my life.” (Macatee, 1) This strong relationship with his mother is the reason

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