Gandhi's Impact On Social Change

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“Innovation is always the work of many. One person can change the world, but their success depends on help from others and on the economic, social, and political context of their time and place.” For as long as conflicts have existed in society, citizens have been inspired by their personal experiences or fascinations with the conflict to attempt to create social change. From Colin Kaepernick’s kneeling before the National Anthem to raise awareness of the Black Lives Matter movement, to the release of Kony 2012 to inform the public of the inhumane use of child soldiers in Africa, to the Occupy Wall Street movement to protest global economic inequality, ordinary citizens will always find a reason to fight if what they believe in is being challenged. …show more content…
In response to the British tax and monopoly on salt and its effect on the Indian people, Gandhi claimed a large portion of his followers after walking hundreds of miles to the coast of India to spark his salt satyagraha (Gandhi Video 1). His followers would be of utmost importance as Gandhi continued to fight against oppression until the day of his death. In response to the civil wars between Hindus and Muslims shortly after India finally gained independence, Gandhi announced to the world his plans to fast until the violence was stopped (Gandhi Collected Works, Pt. 5, 22). In a turn of events proving the impact that one human being can have on an entire society, the violence stopped shortly after word leaked of Gandhi’s protest, and the fast was actually successful. If an ordinary man decided to fast in protest of the violence, very few people in the world would even blink an eye. However, Gandhi’s reputation as a leader and pioneer of social change for the Indian people allowed his fast to work. In the grand scheme of his political career, Gandhi’s actions alone do not quantify the success of his movements. Mahatma Gandhi succeeded as a leader because of the following he created when confronted with a struggling Indian economy due to the …show more content…
Einstein’s philosophical beliefs are best summarized by the following quote: “I have a high regard for the individual and an insuperable distaste for violence and fanaticism” (Einstein, “What I Believe”). After the United States dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki upon Einstein’s urging—a recommendation he almost immediately regretted—and the subsequent Cold War, Einstein went greater lengths to defend this belief by not only aiming to end Joseph Stalin’s form of communism, but also to try establishing a world government as the ultimate protection of individual liberties. However, in addition to the United States’ relations abroad being in a state of flux due to the Cold War, they also faced national issues due to the threat of McCarthyism on free speech. In response to a high school teacher asked to testify his political beliefs in front of Congress, Einstein penned an open letter urging him to practice Gandhian nonviolence (Einstein Video 3). Instead of being celebrated by a large group of people in the same vein as the aforementioned figures, Einstein was attacked by the American people during the Red Scare. Einstein’s mission for world peace would be a tall task in any era, since there has not been a time in recent memory where conflict and civilization did

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