From Neo-Analytical Approach To Gandhi's Personality

1177 Words 5 Pages
Mohandas K. Gandhi, later known as Mahatma Gandhi was the well-known leader of the Indian independent movement in British-rule India who used non-violence civil disobedience that inspired civil right and freedom across the world. Even though Gandhi is known around the world, but does the world know the personality of young Gandhi to the civil rights activist Mahatma Gandhi. In this paper, the reader will understand Gandhi’s personality as a child with the help of neo-analytical theory, to adolescent and adult hood with humanistic approach of personality and understanding the traits aspect of Gandhi’s personality. The paper will cover theories of three psychology school of personality, and theorists, Carl Jung to Abrahams Maslow and as well …show more content…
This led Gandhi to experiment with vegetarianism, removing meat, spices and dairy from his diet. Once he travel to South Africa, he began to face racism, being of a dark skin tone, cast him with little right even though he was a barrister. Working around this Gandhi was able to get out of inferiority complex and humble himself and fight the racism and inequality not for himself, but for the people in South Africa and India. The next theorist is Erik Erikson and his life formation, Gandhi’s personality has change throughout his life and forming to what his is known today, according to Erikson, Gandhi has gone through the stages of personality, completing each from hope in infancy to wisdom in his late adulthood. Around the time Gandhi went to London, at age 19, Gandhi had ground through changes, restricting his diet, meeting various people, learning about various religion, asking for advice to improve himself, and improve his speeches, of course this all took time. The next …show more content…
The researchers first define charismatic, Webster’s definition of charisma as charismatic magnetism (a personal attractiveness that enable you to influence others), the extraordinary qualities of the leader and charismatic leadership. Based on the Webster’s definition of charismatic leadership as 1) person with extraordinary gift and qualities; 2) a social crisis or situation of desperation; 3) a radical vision promising a solution to the crisis; 4) followers who are attracted to the gifted person and believe his or her exceptional powers and radical vision and 5) the validation of the person’s extraordinary gifts and the radical vision by repeated successes in dealing with the perceived crisis. Using the Webster’s definition and using several of Gandhi’s speeches from 1914 to 1948 (16 speeches in total) and compared to US presidents speeches on social movements. Bligh & Robinson concluded that while Gandhi did not fit the definition of neocharismatic tradition (good at public speaking, and personal appeal), Gandhi did fit the Webster’s definition of charisma. From living and traveling like the poor to dressing in simple loin cloth made of pure Indian material and his philosophy of nonviolence that are in his speech of the

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