Presidential Democracy

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The function of a constitution in a democracy is to limit the power of government from infringing on the rights of the people, states, and different branches of government. It sets forth the basic rights of a citizen: life, liberty, right to property, and pursuit of happiness. It also has the fundamentals to establish responsibility for the government to protect those basic rights. It can also serve as a limitation on how those in government may use their power, with consideration that they must simultaneously protect citizen rights as their number one responsibility. The government also must bear rights over the distribution of resources and have control over any major conflict. A constitution can be either changed by disbanding its content …show more content…
The president is elected by the people and has the power to nominate people to take on other roles of government with congressional approval. The elected people are selected to serve a fixed period of time. The laws are debated and passed by the parliament, lobbyists do not have a formal right to be heard, but do exercise some influence on members of parliament, the president may block a law by veto. As the president is elected, he may or may not rely on a majority of the parliament. The president may act immediately- but there is a certain risk that he can rush into conclusions he could be barely willing to withdraw from, even if proven to be unwise from another point of view. In a Parliamentary Democracy the head of state has a different role than the prime minister, it could be a monarch or an elected person. The members of the government is elected by the parliament based on the majority vote, government members must be elected members of parliament. The laws are proposed by the government and debated and passed by parliament. If there is a solid majority, compromises are sought within the coalition. The opposition may be ignored until the next election …show more content…
They will have a federalist system to distribute power amongst the land so that it is not all held to a select few individuals. We, however, are not intending to have a loose union of these regions and form a confederate style of government. The new government that Xlandia will perform under will also be a presidential system. This will also have it so that power is more distributed different areas of the government and the people have power to directly elect the executive of the nation. The rights of minorities and individuals will be protected by a document similar to the United State’s Bill of rights with individual freedoms stated. Choices in the military will be made by high ranking, citizen voted government officials to put power in the hands of the people and helps keep risk of corruption and/or revolution with the government having primary control over the military. There will also be a checks and balances system to keep branches of government from

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