Functional Movement System Case Study

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Correct posture is essential for correct body movement. Without correct posture, muscle imbalances and non-contact injuries may occur. One of the most used screening tests to find these imbalances within an individual is the Functional Movement System (FMS) according to McCall, Carling, Davison, Nedelec, Le Gall, Berthoin, and Dupont (2015). The Functional Movement System is designed to recognize potential weaknesses and risk of injury (Cook, 2010). Therefore, it will be vital for health professionals to use the FMS as a tool to help assess a client’s problem areas and quickly determine if it is safe to begin training. Also, it gives the trainer a place to start when designing a fitness program for their client. The purpose of this study is …show more content…
The FMS test is comprised of seven scored tests, including a deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, shoulder mobility, active straight leg raise, trunk stability push-up, and rotary stability. Also, three pass or fail tests, including, shoulder impingement clearing test, spinal extension clearing test and spinal flexion clearing test. Testing took place in the Health and Human Performance lab of the Royal Brougham of Seattle Pacific University. Each test received a score from 0-3 (21 points possible) or a pass/fail rating. After scoring and recording the FMS test results, the mobility test was used for areas that scored less than a 3. The areas checked for mobility on subject 1 included thoracic extension, ankle flexion, shoulder internal and external rotation, hip adduction, and hip flexion. In addition, for subject 2, the mobility areas checked included thoracic extension, ankle flexion, and hip adduction. Furthermore, tests for normal range of motion were conducted in accordance with in class instruction from Dr. Cannavan, the shoulder mobility assessment handout, and the Range of Joint Motion Evaluation Chart (2016) provided by the Washington State Department of Social and Health …show more content…
Weak ankle mobility was verified by our mobility test (DSHS, 2016). Davies, Bull, Farrelly, and Wakelin (2007) laid out a home-based exercise program that was shown to improve ankle range of motion. We recommended that subject 1 follow their program of warm up, resisted plantar flexion, and passive dorsiflexion for up to six months or until the normative value for dorsiflexion is reached. In addition, another possible intervention is an ankle mobility drill. This is when the participants goes to a wall and places one foot a few inches from the wall and the other foot places behind. The participant will then touch their knee to the wall straight, medially and laterally in a slow and controlled motion. Finally, a proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretch can increase the ankle mobility of the subject as well. First, with a partner, the subject’s foot is placed in dorsiflexion for 30 seconds, then the partner will passively put the subject’s foot in plantar flexion, while the subject resists the push for five to six seconds. After, the partner will passively put the subject’s foot into increased dorsiflexion. This will allow the participants to sit deeper into the squat while keeping their entire foot on the ground. Subject two during the deep squat test showed little to no gastrocnemius

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