Full Inclusion Essay

2429 Words 10 Pages
Register to read the introduction… In 1817, The Connecticut Asylum at Hartford for the Instruction of Deaf and Dumb Persons opens. It is the first permanent school for the deaf in the U.S. Hervey Wilbur helps establish the Massachusetts School for Idiotic and Feebleminded Youth, the first school of its kind in the U.S. This school opens its doors in 1848. Following the opening of the Massachusetts School for Idiotic and Feebleminded Youth, the New York State Asylum for Idiots opens. Pennsylvania now begins funding the Pennsylvania Training School for Feeble-Minded Children, a private school for children with intellectual disabilities, in …show more content…
“Occupational therapy in full-inclusion classrooms: a case study from the Moorpark model provides a historic review of the movement toward integrated classroom placements as well as the characteristics of full-inclusion classrooms relevant to occupational therapy school-based practice. A full-inclusion model adopted by the Moorpark Unified School District is described. This model incorporates occupational therapy as a vital and integral component of the school's inclusive education efforts” (Martinez). Another pertinent case study is the Student Retention and Attendance Study. When reviewing the Student Retention and Attendance Study, comparisons were made at first, second, and third grades. Students identified with exceptional education needs were included in all comparisons. While assessments showed improved reading performance for all students, the most dramatic improvements occurred among the lowest achievers. “In spite of the fact that these inner city schools have normally high retention problems, only 4% of the fourth graders in the experimental group had ever been held back one or more grades, while the five control schools had 31% who had failed at least one year”(Byrnes 228). And lastly, the National Study of Inclusive Education conducted in 1994 shows that the practice of inclusion is spreading in the United States. This study was conducted by The National Center on Educational Restructuring …show more content…
Cooperative learning is a successful teaching strategy in which small teams, each with students of different levels of ability, use a variety of learning activities to improve their understanding of a subject. Each member of a team is responsible not only for learning what is taught but also for helping teammates learn, thus creating an atmosphere of achievement. Students work through the assignment until all group members successfully understand and complete it. Constructivism states that people construct their own understanding and knowledge of the world, through experiencing things and reflecting on those experiences. When we encounter something new, we have to reconcile it with our previous ideas and experience, maybe changing what we believe, or maybe discarding the new information as irrelevant. During constructivist activities, “we are active creators of our own knowledge”(Koch). It is for these reasons; this researcher feels that if all children were to be given an individualized learning experience, their education success would

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