L. Lennie Irvin's What Is Academic Writing?

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Writing does not come easily to everyone. No one starts out writing perfect essays, and everyone has areas where they need improvement. It takes many different skills, time, and a lot of revision. High school writing is much different from college writing, and with the help from the article “What Is Academic Writing?” by L. Lennie Irvin and chapter one in “From Inquiry to Academic Writing” it is easier to understand what academic writing is about and how it works.
In L. Lennie Irvin’s article “What is Academic Writing?” he does a great job of explaining what academic writing is and how it works. His article is about how there are many things that people believe about writing that are not completely true. There are many skills you need to have to be a good writer, such
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You also need to know how to pick and limit your writing topic. Rather than having many different ideas about one topic jumbled together, pick one idea and make a good, clear essay about it. You must have a topic where you are able to limit the size and handle it well. To be successful with academic writing, you must understand what you are doing when you write and it also depends on how you go about your writing task. In chapter one of “From Inquiry to Academic Writing”, Stuart Greene and April Lidinsky explain that academic writing is how scholars communicate with each other in their fields of study, and that you have to learn to think, read, do research, and write like an academic, but it won’t be easy. The skills needed for academic writing are not only valued in school, but outside of school as well. Academic writing involves making an argument by attempting to change people’s minds and behaviors and supporting that argument with good reasons, you don’t want to “shout down” your opponent. There are four habits of mind that are outlined in this chapter, which are very analytical. Analysis involves breaking something down into different parts and seeing how

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