Frida Kahlo's Genetic Identity Of The Individual

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Genetic Identity of the Individual Every individual cherishes his or her individuality, identity, or unique role in the world. As defined in the Oxford Dictionary, individuality is “the quality or character of a particular person or thing that distinguishes them from others of the same kind.” Professional sociologists have long debated the power of environment in shaping identity, thus playing a role in the individual’s world view and responses. Frida Kahlo visually represented the influence of the environment on the individual in her painting, Self Portrait Between the Borderline of Mexico and the United States, 1932, depicting the vast differences between Mexico and the United States, while also conveying her dismay at the American …show more content…
Any given genome involves over three billion base pairs, and these pairs of nucleotide bases serve as the building blocks of deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA (Jobling, et. al.). The order of nucleotides in the genetic sequence is what distinguishes one person from another. Differing sequences of DNA translate into different proteins that dictate the physiological features that develop in an individual. This pattern is the central dogma of genetics, stating that DNA undergoes a three step process to produce a polypeptide or protein. The proteins determine the color of someone’s hair, how their neurons develop, and much more. As Dr. Mark Jobling and his team of genetics professors at the University of Leicester reported, differences between people arise because “Each human genome is unique, differing by an average of about 0.1 per cent” (Jobling, et. al.). Single nucleotide polymorphisms, or the exchange of one nucleotide for another in the DNA, can lead to huge trait differences across a population, such as eye color and IQ potential; polymorphisms indicate racial ancestry and geographic diversity, as these differences tend to cluster within certain populations (Jobling, et. al.). Genetic uniqueness is responsible for both personal features and group identities, further indicating its importance in the development of an …show more content…
Twin studies are the most common research method when investigating the dueling effects of genetics and environment. Twins have identical genotypes, so differences in their behaviors can be attributed to differences in their environment. These studies have produced results that support the influence of genetics over environment since the 1970s. For example, Scientific American contributor Charles Choi reported on the political findings of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and the data from both fraternal and identical twins studies indicated that “72 percent of differences in voting turnout and roughly 60 percent of differences in other political activity” can be attributed to genetics (Choi). This meant that people of different environments with different experiences made the same choices, and those choices then had to be linked to their genetic similarity. New findings such as these have led to the development of behavioral genetics subfields, such as political genetics, that continue to bring light to the relationship between genetics, environment, and human behaviors contributing to

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