Freud's Phychoanalytic Theory Of Ego Depletion

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Maranges and Baumeister define self-control as the ability to alter one’s thoughts and behaviors, or override impulses and habits in order to monitor and regulate oneself to meet goals and expectations. Self-control can be linked to ego-depletion, in which constant use of self-control in one context can impair control in other contexts. Cognitive behavioral ego depletion is similar, and pays homage to, Freud’s psychoanalytic theory of fixation and regression. Both ideas are due to the damning up and limiting of resources which cause an inability to do something. Ego depletion has been tested using the dual-task paradigm where participants perform two different tasks that are unrelated but require self-control. In support of self-control and …show more content…
If an individual acquires positive habits in pursuit of a goal, it is possible to automatically self-regulate even in the face of ego depletion. The individual would continue this positive habit without having to control their behavior or have conscious awareness. In other words, cognition (“O”) is not needed to pursue a goal, only the stimulus and response (“S” and “R”). External cues and priming can activate these goal-directed behaviors and experience can strengthen (reinforce) the …show more content…
Training self-regulation in one skill will hopefully generalize to other, more important, skills that are difficult to improve in other ways. Berkman gives us 3 theoretical models of self-regulation training: the strength model, motivational models, and cognitive models. The strength model is related to ego depletion where it states that self-regulation draws upon a limited resource. This resource can be strengthened with consistent self-regulation. This limited resource is shared across domains so improvement in one domain should result in improvement in another domain. The motivational models state that goals closely related to one’s self of identity (and thus give the pursuer a type of intrinsic motivation) are more likely to be pursued than goals that give extrinsic motivation. This can be related to Rogers idea of motivation being the most important and basic drive. The cognitive models state that success in self-regulation is a function of self-efficacy. Cognitive training is based on learning or conditioning that reinforces associations between cognitions and behaviors. This is linked to Bandura’s idea of self-efficacy where an individual has an internal belief that they have an expectation of success when engaging in something; if you believe in something it is more likely to happen. When comparing all

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