Sigmund Freud's Iceberg Theory

952 Words 4 Pages
Developed by Sigmund Freud, psychoanalytic theory of personality attributes thoughts and actions to unconscious motives and conflicts (Myers & DeWall 2014). Basically saying the unconscious minds fears, desires, and wishes shape our personalities, sometimes in small ways others acute. This unconscious mind is an important concept to grasp in understanding psychoanalytic theory. The unconscious mind is an accumulation of all the mental processes ranging from wishes to memories that are under the surface or perceived by your own. Versus when you are conscious of something you know it exist and is happening, example would be moving your arm to pitch a baseball, thinking about what to eat, or observing a particular quality of an object. But even …show more content…
The unconscious mind according to Freud is the dominating factor in which ones personality is developed. So how does the unconscious mind really mold personality? “Personality arises from a conflict between impulse and restraint.” (Myers & DeWall 2014 pg. 313). That’s the view Freud held but he described it better with his classic iceberg metaphor. See the mind is split into three categories; the id, the ego, and the super ego. Similar to an iceberg in that both have only certain sections that are visible on the surface. The ego is visible tip of the iceberg, but we will return to explaining the ego after we first explain the id which is not visible. The id is the storage unit for unconscious thoughts and urges. Its main purpose is to survive and by doing so it aims to fulfill our basic needs of reproduction, satisfaction, and aggression. The id takes a very hedonistic approach to goals, meaning that instant …show more content…
As a young child your brain develops through different stages all of which can permanently effect your personality. There are many aspects to consider, children’s environments and parental influences vary and range so far that it can be overwhelming to truly distinguish what scenario unfolded to provide a person’s particular personality, but there are many good theories and through therapy much can be achieved in this regard. According to psychoanalytic theory children develop personality through the process of repression. Burying down certain feelings and memories into their unconscious in order to adjust to their circumstances. Think of it almost like a sandbox and you have a tiny wooden stick. When you press down into the sand you leave a depression. A sequence of these depressions, or simply called drawing, can make the sand appear to be a symbol or art. So everyone gets their own individual sequence of depressions which overall forms what personality they have. Two main terms identification and fixation are types of repressions processes that children use to develop personality characteristics. Identification is the “psychological process whereby the subject assimilates an aspect, property or attribute of the other and is transformed, wholly or partially, after the model the other provides. It is by means of a series of identifications that the personality is constituted and

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