French Settlements

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The North American French, Spanish, and British settlements differed both in objectives and religiously, yet held similar economical achievements. The North American French settlements stretched from the north of present day Canada down to the state of Louisiana. The goals of the French explorers were to obtain wealth by finding a route linking the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans that would promote trade and finding good along the Great Lakes. King Francis I sent Jacques Cartier to accomplish the task. Cartier discovered a “great inlet” of the St. Lawrence River and claimed it, naming the territory New France. The Native Indians of the territory, the Huron, welcomed Cartier and showed him the highest point of the island, which he named Mont …show more content…
Champlain journeyed to North America in hopes of finding territory that would stimulate French fur trading. He stumbled upon land into the north of the continent and entitled it Quebec. The Huron Indians of the settlement aided Champlain with the fur trading establishment, but the production was slow due to such a small population. Desperate to turn things around, Champlain turned to Louis XIV for assistance. Louis transformed New France into a Royal province, which increased the population dramatically. With the new flow of immigration, the travelers began to move south and west of the Great lakes, along the Ohio river. They eventually made their way around the Ohio and reached the Mississippi. One explorer by the name of Robert de la Salle became determined to touch the opening of the Mississippi. He soon met his goal and claimed possession of the entire region, giving it the name Louisiana. Once the settlements were established, the settlers developed fishing and fur trading posts with the Micmac Indian. Also, Jesuit missionaries arrived from France and set up …show more content…
The goals of the cruel and greedy Spanish conquistadors were to conquer as much land and obtain as much money as possible. The first Spanish settlement in north America was Santo Domingo, captured by Diego Columbus in 1496. Afterwards in 1513, Vasco Núñez de Balboa founded Santa María la Antigua de Darián. Balboa’s discovery sped up the Spanish expansion of the West. The Spanish then took control of the Caribbean Islands after conquering Cuba and finding Havana. Next in 1521, the Aztec kingdom in Mexico was seized. The Spaniards were cruel to the natives and defeated them all to obtain their territory. After the battles for the Mexican land, the catholic churches of Spain voyaged over in order to spread Christianity and convert the indigenous people. Christian missions were set up in Mexico and part of America to spread the ideas and beliefs of Christianity in North America. Also, within their settlements, the Spanish established sugar plantation and used the natives as a source of labor. When the natives died, they import African slaves to replace the deceased. The native were also used to mine for gold, but when the aspiration for gold died, the Spanish switched to ranching and farming to create a profit. Their settlements grew products such as corn, beans, and

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