Freewill Argument

Decent Essays
Introduction In this paper, I will break apart J. L. Mackie’s stern defense of the logical problem of evil, which he uses to suggest the God does not exist. I will attempt to defend the notion that both God and evil, in the form of human creation, can exist in the world by way of suggesting that freewill is the answer. Furthermore, I will strengthen the argument for freewill against Mackie’s defense, which suggests that the argument of freewill also compromises the Omni-three nature of God. In part, I will back freewill by using Mackie’s own logic against him. In its totality, I will build up a strong force against the logical problem of evil, leaving room for both the existence of human formed evil and God in this world under the umbrella …show more content…
As I will be using it, freewill is an individual’s ability to make choices. Yet, to say that our choices are not guided, I argue is incorrect. For instance, I believe that one’s natural instinct to remove his hand from a hot surface can be seen as a guide to good behavior. Basically, the impulse to get away from the surface is says that “putting your hand near fiery hot objects is dangerous” and that “it’s probably safer to keep away”. Of course for freewill to still exist, that suggestion must be taken in many way, which indeed it is. Most people will oblige the suggestion by keep hot surfaces at a distance. At the same time, some will ignore it briefly to play with matched and, to the extreme, others will straight up go against it by burning themselves. In all facets of life, there are varying degrees of freedom from the guides put in place. The ability to divert from these guides constitutes freewill. The guides themselves represent in my opinion an outline of good behavior impressment upon the world by an omnibenevolent God. That God wants the greatest good. However, to limit the degrees of freedom from which people can diverge is to limit freewill and to ultimately limit the quality of the resulting good, which I will dive into more in just a bit. The main point here is that people can choose otherwise and, thus they can choice to be evil, resulting in a world were evil …show more content…
Yes, God is omnipotent. But if it is true that men were created in the image of God, that, too, would mean that God is in the image of us. To my knowledge, it is the mind that controls the body. Therefore, I presume it must be God’s omniscience, a quality of the mind, that controls his omnipotence, a quality of the body. Both Mackie’s logical problem of evil and his further dismissal of the freewill hypothesis incorrectly focus on God in terms of his power, not of the knowledge that controls it. I will not make the same mistake. So, I will regard every exertion of power as an exertion of knowledge for God must have reasons behind exerting power. If there is no smart reason to exert power, as is the case for the freewill system, no exertion of power should be expected. God must first fulfill his omniscience. His omnipotence is a secondary action that can still remain in tacked regardless of use. For instance, I know it is probably a dumb idea to punch another, so I do not. But just by holding back from action, does not mean I am incapable of it. It merely means my mind thought it better to suspend action. In this way, God can think it better to suspend control over

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    God created humans with the will to choose the good in a battle between good and evil. However, He also granted the power to choose evil. Mackie argues why, then, did God not use His powers to create a world that always freely choose right? “His failure to avail himself of this possibility is inconsistent with his being both omnipotent and wholly good” [1;348]. Humans describe things using comparative methods.…

    • 983 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Rowe’s paper, he approaches the subject of God verses no God in a very different context. His forethought for discussing this topic is to understand the existence of evil. Is evil a reason to dispute the existence of God, or an omnipotent, benevolent being? Rowe broaches this subject in understanding the reason for suffering in the world. He states that a reason that atheism is more probable is due to the fact that any benevolent being would not allow suffering to occur unless it was for the greater good or the suffering was in place of something worse happening.…

    • 784 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Natural disasters, death of a loved one, business failure, so many things are evil, and Augustine explains that the only reason any of that happens is free will . He stresses on the fact that God wanted us to have free will, but there is a problem in that theory. He discusses that there are some people that have free will and not sin at all; this he argues is a defect in that person’s character because God creates humans as “wholly good” and never responsible for evil. He further explains that origin of evil is incomprehensible and uses the idea that good is the privation of evil (the theory that Aquinas supports) . Furthermore, he claims that evil is not separate, or in competition, with the force of good, rather evil is parasitic on good .…

    • 1145 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    A counter to this announcement is God gave people the decision to act uninhibitedly. In this way, the issue of insidiousness was produced by the nature of flexibility of decision that god connected to people. In any case, this comment would undermine God 's omniscient quality since all-knowing ought to incorporate knowing the future, or this would turn into a point of confinement to it. Thusly, by knowing the future disasters that giving human 's through and through freedom would bring about would even now miss the mark concerning being maximally great. Along these lines, a God that is omnibenevolent, supreme, and omniscient can 't coherently…

    • 1071 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Julian's Theory Of Evil

    • 1207 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Natural evil may also be called unjustified, as it cannot be justified by reason or explanation. The problem of evil is relying on the existence of natural evil. It cannot use metaphysical evil because by definition it depends on God’s existence. The evil exists simply because God exists and is perfect. It cannot use moral evil because this can be explained by the necessary existence of free will.…

    • 1207 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    John Hick bases the argument concerning the problem of the evil by questioning the existence of an omnipresent and omnipotent God. Though he presents a positive objection to God, he argues that if God is all loving and the most powerful then he could not create evil on earth. With the ability and powers to eliminate evil on earth, evil still exists though God plans and intends no evil, therefore, there exist likeliness that Hick doubts Gods powers over creations or even Gods existence at all. This essay will focus on the existence of evil and why Christians go through such evil and still believe in Gods existence. The theologian justifies his stand by stating that some evil exists within the Gods plan so that human beings can rectify their ways immediately after living by the consequences of their action.…

    • 898 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    A secondary benefit is that it is logically possible for God to make humans that have freedom and always choose between degrees of goodness in every occasion. On the one hand, if we accept (i), freedom is meaningless because evil is logically inconsistent with God’s omnipotence and omnibenevolence. On the other hand, if we accept (ii), freedom is meaningless because randomness is logically inconsistent with our valuing of things as supremely good. This is Mackie’s paradox of omnipotence—both (i) and (ii) indicate that God’s omnipotence is limited, and thus inconsistent with the theists notion of freedom, evil, and God. Therefore, omnipotence is logically…

    • 1089 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Pico believes in unlimited human potential, while Augustine believes our potential is predestined by god's will (limited). Both Augustine and Pico had to reject the main argument of each others position, in order to end up in the position that they took. In order for Pico to arrive at his position, he had to reject Augustine's main argument on original sin . Because if Pico believed in original sin, that would make humans imperfect. If you are not perfect, then your potential cannot possibly be unlimited.…

    • 833 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    God Allows Evil Essay

    • 1801 Words
    • 7 Pages

    I believe that God allows evil to exist for reasons that we do not understand, but I also believe that he was not the one who created it. I believe that God created man, and that man created evil. According to the bible, God The reason as to why God allows evil may never be known, but others have arrived at the conclusion that God must want to teach people a lesson. Another theory is that he literally cannot or will not do anything to stop evil from happening because he gave us free will. Regardless as to why he allows it to happen, the bible states that he will judge Earth’s inhabitants and he will at this time banish evil forever.…

    • 1801 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Being free means that we have the choice to do evil things, a choice which some of us choose to exercise. This theodicy gains so many followers because it states that God does not create evil, yet evil can not be avoided without depriving us of our fundamental freedom of will. Moreover, the world without freedom would be an overall worse place. Through an examination of this explanation, it seems to preserve God 's goodness, because he created the best possible world. It also preserves his omnipotence and omniscience, because although he does know about evil and could stop it, the reason he chooses not to interfere is to ensure our freedom.…

    • 1336 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays