The Constitution: The Founding Fathers

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From a very young age Americans are taught to respect various aspects of their culture because they are from the “land of the free and home of the brave” and they have freedoms that citizens of other counties cannot afford to have the luxury of having. The reason America has more freedoms and rights that are outlined with the Constitution. Most Americans agree that they appreciate the Constitution, but some do not agree with everything that is outlined within it. This was the case with some of the founding fathers, which wrote the Constitution. The Constitution, for the time in which it was established, implemented necessary standards for the newly independent colonies that were fundamentally essential to the basis of the country for years …show more content…
Each of the founders proposed a different issue with the Constitution, but overall the main concern was among them involved the fear of too much power. The United States Constitution gives power most of the power to the people because it is based off of a democratic outline of government, but still requires a leader. At this time, James Madison and Alexander Hamilton argued democracy was the best governmental system outline to follow because they believed that advocating for the majority should be a higher priority . They wholeheartedly supported the ideas of the people and wanted to let everyone have a say. Some of the men in the Ant-Federalist Party disagreed with the idea of democracy because they favored they favored the idea of rule of the few elite. Among the men to support this was John Adams. John Adams blatantly favored oligarchy over democracy and advocated why it was the best model of government for the United States . Adams argued that he opposed this idea of democracy because he feared the extremists of the majority would over throw the government creating chaos and mob …show more content…
For United States citizens today, the complexity of language within the Constitution has created difficulty for people to understand all of the details within the outline of federalism . Unlike the founders, a majority of the citizens today, do not interact with laws on a regular basis, so they do not understand all of the details of how exactly federalism worked. Both in the original writing and today, citizens should take advantage of the opportunity of becoming educated about the government in which they are governed by as well as when the government, both federal and state, have over stepped their

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