Frederick Douglass Turning Point Analysis

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Frederick Douglass, a significant figure in the abolitionist movement and is known for his writings about civil rights and racial equality. He was born into slavery but despite this his “take-charge” attitude played a significant role in his life. Specifically, the turning points of his life, which eventually led to his escape from slavery. These turning points include his realization of the horrors of slavery, learning how to read, and his fight against Mr. Covey. The first turning point in Frederick’s life is the realization of the horrors of slavery. He becomes aware of the horrors when he witnesses the beating of his Aunt Hester. Captain finds that she has gone out with a slave named Ned, against the his orders when he calls for Hester …show more content…
Covey. Mr. Covey was known for his reputation in breaking slaves. In fact, for a short while he even managed to “break” Frederick’s spirit, crushing his ambition and ridding of his want to read (his path to freedom). Douglass’ mental state is reduced to that of an animal.This is the lowest point in his life as he is met with suicidal thoughts but he is later met with an epiphany. He decides that he'd rather die than be treated like a slave anymore. He stands up to Mr. Covey and they fight for two hours. Mr. Covey is the one who ended up “getting entirely the worst end of it”. Frederick had the upperhand in the fight even with the the jumping in of Mr. Hughes. Frederick’s “take-charge” attitude comes into play here as he his fighting in self defense and managed to have control over the fight. After this fight he has his confidence back and gained back all of the qualities he had lost while being broken by Mr. Covey. This is basically his “resurrection from the tomb of slavery”. To not ruin his reputation as a slavebreaker, Mr. Covey doesn’t send him off to the public whipping post to punish him. In fact Frederick is not unfairly whipped ever again. In the many turning points of Frederick Douglass’ life, his “take-charge” attitude plays a role in it, to a notable extent. The major turning points of his life include the whipping of his Aunt Hester (which was his introduction to slavery), learning how to read (which

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