Frederick Douglass's Impact On The Civil War

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“What to the slave is the fourth of July” quoted Frederick Douglass, a black man that was born into slavery and made astonishing accomplishments throughout his life. I personally believe that Frederick Douglass had the biggest impact on the Civil war, along with the abolitionist movement. I believe this because of his determination, independent personality and his strength, both mentally and physically. He taught himself to read and write and he accomplished great things through those skills. He experienced many hard ships during his life but always managed to overcome them and impacted American History immensely.
Throughout Douglass’ life we’ve witnessed him time after time make history. You’ve probably heard of him before. He was born on
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Again he failed so he attempted one last time and succeeded with the help of Anna Murray, his future wife. He created multiple documents throughout his life and sent in multiple newspaper articles. He wrote “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave” at the age of 27 which was later sold around the country and was also translated into numerous European languages, and he created “The Columbian Orator” while he was enslaved and it viewed his opinion on slavery and was written when he first started to realize what slavery was. Not only that but he was also the founder of “The North Star” news paper and also subscribed to William Lloyd Garrison’s weekly Journal, “The Liberator”. He and his wife finally settled in New Bedford, Massachusetts where they had five kids including one of his kids that died at 10 years of age. Frederick changed his last name to Douglass from Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey to hide his identity after escaping from slavery. Once the Civil War rolled around, Frederick consulted Lincoln and helped him pass the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing all enslaved blacks. After the passing of this document and after Lincoln’s death, Lincoln’s wife sent Douglass his last cane he ever owned: showing her respect and gratitude towards Frederick. Douglass also was nominated for vice president of the United States as a member of the equal rights party while he politely passed by not running in the election. However it wasn’t just the Abolitionist Movement that he played a part in, He attended the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848, showing his support towards woman’s

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