Frederick Douglass Qualities

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Being an African American once a slave, Frederick Douglass had many qualities. Douglass was not only an abolitionist (a person who favors the abolition of a practice or isution, especially capital punishment or informally slaver), but also an African American social reformer, public speaker, a politician, and a writer. Becoming an abolitionist leader and a great writer people found it hard to believe, since he had once been a slave and slaves weren’t allowed to learn to read or write. Equality among all was his most important believe, he believed that, disregard gender, sex, or whatever ones preferences one had that everyone deserved to be equal. Douglass’s importance came from fighting for African American freedom and rights, not by using …show more content…
All this was done because Frederick Douglass started a Sunday school for African American children to teach them to read, and Edward Convey was the man to “tame” slaves, or so it was said. As the online article PBS Online wrote, “Douglass was broken in bod, soul and spirit”. The essence of PBS Online statement, is not that Douglass wasn’t only physically and mentally tired of the abuse but that he had enough of being a slave. Everything he went through was so harsh that his joy was lit out, and soul was being hurt. Douglass’s reaction to working six months with him was to runaway temporally, to rest even if it meant only a few day and coming back to something unexpected. At the time of Douglass return, Covey attacked him. To Conveys surprise, Douglass’s reaction was to fight back. This lasted two hours which then Convey …show more content…
William Lloyd Garrison would be the man who became really impressed on the formality/style that Frederick Douglass had when it came to his writing. There were those of course those anti-abolitionists who would occasionally not only threaten him, but would beat Douglass as well. “Douglass was many times accused of being too smart and well-spoken to have been a slave”. 1845, would be a year to bring him many good things. He wrote his book authors life, each would leave him money to not only be able to buy his freedom, but to start his own newspaper, which he would call North Star Douglass. In the article Frederick Douglass

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