Land Grant College Act

Improved Essays
In the mid-eighteenth century an educational revolution was brewing in the country. Many people viewed the traditional colleges as aristocratic and outdated with course work that mainly produced educators, lawyers, and theologians. People called for a new method of collegiate learning, one that focused on broadening the education of students by promoting agricultural centered schools, science, and engineering. These new colleges would not only allow students to choose their own classes but also opened up the doors for higher education for women and African Americans. The turning point in this educational reform came when the Land Grant College Act was passed in 1862 allowing many of the new age colleges to be built. This act granted each congressional …show more content…
Fred Olmsted was one of the leading architects in designing land grant colleges. He was originally mainly interested in the design of public parks and he carried his motivations and beliefs over into the building of college campuses. His core beliefs were “democratic idealism and commitment to the welfare of the working class” (CITATION NEEDED 140) which carried over into the planning of college campuses. He designed colleges to be a part of a large community which would have the sole purpose of promoting a heathy environment for the students. He wanted colleges to not be placed in the middle of rural areas but he was also against placing a campus in an urban setting. In his opinion the perfect setting would be in a suburban environment with the correct mixing of domestic life and nature. To further the domestic feeling of the campuses he designed he would propose a number of small houses being built instead of a large dormitory building which would later be named the cottage system. He rejected the rigid planning of some universities and called for a “free liberal, picturesque arrangement”. (CITATION NEEDED 145). The cottages and academic buildings were normally designed to flow with the land not against it creating a park like area for students. Olmsted did this type of setting on purpose because he believed …show more content…
In the 1700’s colleges would often discourage sports believing it was beneath the gentlemen attending the schools, however in the 1800’s the views towards sports changed dramatically. Many schools started an athletic program and encouraged their students to participate. This new movement greatly benefited the land grant and rural colleges because it gave them a new way to attract new enrollees and bringing about a new type of status among the schools. The more rural schools could also easily expand to include the athletic buildings. This influenced the architecture of the campus because the planners needed to find a eye pleasing way to hide the often huge buildings that housed the

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    When the United States government wanted to start to populate the midwest, they used land claiming to get them there. Finally, in the Morrill Act, they wanted to educate farmers, so what did they do? They offered land to the states to form colleges. This is a major key point in history, because of the apparent impact the government had on the American…

    • 922 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Hamilton believed that American manufacturers and businesses would help the nation flourish, also through higher prices and taxes. Jefferson believed that agriculture and trade would help bring the nation’s economy flourish. When it comes down to minorities Hamilton was not a fan because they were mostly farmers. However, Jefferson believes that they deserve equal rights and laws that everyone else has. Jefferson needed the minority vote during his presidential campaign because without them his economic plan for agriculture would be in jeopardy.…

    • 836 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Morrill act was made to make college for that was based on agriculture, the mechanic arts, and military tactics with not forgetting about literary or scientific studies. The establishment of the land grant allowed states to have 30,000 acres of public land for each member in Congress. The land grant gave the opportunity for colleges so then that made it possible for more of the public to go and get a higher education. Since the nation was torn apart because of the Civil War the nation would be able to have the leaders and workers needed to rebuild a torn nation through the institutions being build. This made the nation…

    • 1091 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It gave them a chance to start a new form of government without a king. The only problem was Hamilton and Jefferson did not have the same idea of the type of government they wanted to accomplish for their new nation. Hamilton wanted to accomplish a strong central government. He wanted a government that would be able to control the people’s behavior. He understood that “sometimes good people do bad things and bad people do good things”, this gave Hamilton an advantage because Jefferson did not recognize this.…

    • 829 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Jefferson's Vision

    • 751 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Jefferson felt as though a village was a safer, and heathier way of living. He wanted an open square of grass and trees, which he achieved by having ten gardens and an open lawn at the center of the plan. Lastly Jefferson wanted to take religion out of the university, and did so by not having a church found on the plan. At the time America had just broken away from Europe and the church, so Jefferson wanted to take the same idea to…

    • 751 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Clay saw the importance of a transportation network, roads, canals, and later on, railroads that connected the country and made it easier for goods to be transported. However, President Madison vetoed a bill to give states aid for infrastructure, deeming it unconstitutional. The Jeffersonian Democratic-Republicans were opposed to using federal money to support interstate improvements. Some members of the Democratic-Republican party believed that internal improvement projects would only benefit the state where the project is being constructed and not the whole nation. Therefore, they advocated that the state itself should fund the project.…

    • 1154 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    What was so unique about his work and his proposal? Mann was a leading reformer for the education system in the United States (U.S.), which began the Common School Movement. The difference between his proposal and the existing schooling of the late eighteenth century was this system was going to be publicly funded. The irregularity managed school system allowed Mann to determine what skills and contents needed for an individual to pursue a higher education. When Mann was at Brown University he started focusing on social reforms that gave way to his focus on education.…

    • 922 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Mistakes In History

    • 836 Words
    • 4 Pages

    History can be considered as the entrance to a brighter future for history provides information about the reformation and the molding of the American country. History enlightens the population about the upbringing of the America, beginning with the colonial ages. Mistakes were made in order to form the America of today. History teaches people about those mistakes and how our past generations overcame those trials. Due to the knowledge of history, America is quickly advancing in industrialization and technology.…

    • 836 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Progressive Reformers

    • 1116 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Education reformer, John Dewey, drove the higher education reform through his assertion that the United States educational system needed to prepare students for the modern era by making personal development the focus of the curriculum (Norton, 549). The education reform successfully increased the number of enrolled students in a public school system to 78% by 1920 (Norton, 549). Overall, the growth of the American school systems successfully allowed for an increase in college and universities. Due to the increase in college and university availability, there was a decrease in child labor throughout the US. Middle class women who called themselves “The Women’s Movement”, faced mixed results in the desire to move beyond the household and into higher education, paid professions and equal rights (Norton, 555).…

    • 1116 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The decrease in visibility will prevent an athlete in continuing to the next level, thus playing during the week helps athlete’s athletic career. However, Gerdy misconstrued the idea, but “working too hard to generate revenue somehow taints the purity of college sports”(Gerdy). Focusing on revenue makes college sports more of a business rather than an addition to college. Also, practice times must decrease in order increase the possibilities for student athletes. Athletes are on ground to play sports, but they are also there to get an education.…

    • 1129 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays