Haydn's Surprise Symphony Analysis

As a composer, Franz Joseph Haydn created many symphonies and refreshing pieces for the world to hear. He began his career after his voice broke; he decided to make a living off of teaching and playing violin. Haydn also studied counterpart and harmony. He became an assistant composer for Nicola Porpora and was named the court musician in the Esterházy family, and became accustomed to being isolated from other composers. Since he was isolated from the musical trends of the world, his works were unique, which is one of the reasons why he is the most influential composer in history. Symphony Number 94, otherwise known as the Surprise Symphony, created different opinions of Franz Joseph Haydn. The audience who was listening …show more content…
100 in G Major “Military” the most. In the first movement, the violins start with a sweet melody while the bassoons accompany them. After a few more lines, the movement passes a new melody to the flutes, answered again by the violins. Once the ensemble is in unison, Haydn creates perfect openings for soloists. The second movement opened up a new world for listeners and composers around the world. Instruments that were only used in operas such as the bass drum, crash cymbals, and triangle, were used in the second movement of Haydn’s Military Symphony. The audience loved it and had never seen those kinds of instruments incorporated into a Symphony. The whole symphony is an exquisite work of art, from the second and third movements of bold and playful melodies by the oboe and flutes, to the energetic fourth movement, Finale …show more content…
There were so many requests to see him that he decided to take calls and visits only after 2:00 PM, so he could work and stay in good health. During his stay in London, he composed twelve beautiful symphonies, some known as the “Paris Symphonies,” and a few operas. He also went to concerts from composers like Handel. When he first heard Handel’s Messiah, he cried. He respected Handel and believed that he was the “master of all of us.” Although Haydn enjoyed working with the Esterházy family for over thirty years, he was lonely. He moved to Vienna, Austria, and became well-acquainted with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Mozart and Haydn played string quartets together, and attending each other’s rehearsals. Mozart even dedicated six quartets to his dear friend. They were close colleagues and respected each other. After Haydn died, Mozart’s Requiem was played to honor him. On his way home, Haydn met a young composer named Ludwig Van Beethoven, in 1792. Beethoven showed Haydn one of his compositions, and Haydn was impressed. He took the young composer in as his pupil for a short duration of

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