Economic Reform In Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal

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Franklin Roosevelt was elected by a landslide because he pledged a New Deal for the American people who were facing an economic crisis of the likes they had not seen before. Roosevelt was sworn in on March 4th, 1933 (Norton, 2015.) The following day he implemented the first step of his New Deal, which sought to address the problems of the Great Depression by, helping the banks to become solvent again, encouraging competing companies to cooperate, and giving jobs to the unemployed. The banking crisis could be traced back to the affluent years of World War 1. Banks had made risky loans many of which went bad after the stock-market collapse of 1929. With out funds to cover customers ' deposits, banks were closing. Roosevelt’s first action was …show more content…
One act that became the heart of the New Deal was the National Industrial Recovery Act. This act was started on the belief that “destructive competition” had worsened industry’s economic woes. By authorizing competing businesses to cooperate in in crafting industrywide codes that allowed manufacturers to establish industrywide prices and wages. The idea was that with set prices and wages consumer spending would increase, creating a need for more employees. The National Recovery Administration was an out come of the National Industrial Recovery Act, this allowed employees the right to form unions. While it seemed a good idea was very similar to the associationalism which the Hoover administration had approved. Although this was passed as an attempt to recover from the depression the problems of the National Recovery Administration, where to big to overcome and it was ended by the Supreme Court in 1935 (Norton, …show more content…
The basic meaning of which was that you should not give hand outs but rather, a hand up. I person may need a job but did not need unearned aid. So the emphasizes of New Deal programs was work relief or relief by providing jobs. The Civil Work Administration was born of this thought pattern. By January 1934 four million people had been hired by this one program most earning $15 a week. Another program the Civilian Conservation Corps paid unmarried young men one dollar a day to do hard outdoor labor. Although segregated by race this program brought together young men from varying backgrounds. By 1942 the Civilian Conservation Corps had hired two and a half million men, including Native Americans who worked on Indian reservations. Most of the work relief programs neglected the needs of poor women. Mothers of young children were typically classified as “unemployable” therefor given direct relief rather than jobs. In some states this aid was a large portion of the help given out. For example, in North Carolina the “mother’s-aid,” or money given to unemployable mothers, was one-sixth of the wages paid in a federal works program

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