The Effects Of Roosevelt's New Deal

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After the country was struck with the Great Depression, the nation and its people still faced many terrible conditions. The stock market had crashed which led to mass poverty across America. This was a shock that changed everyday life for so many unsuspecting citizens. In 1933, a man by the name of Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected for the presidency. He had numerous innovative ideas that would evolve into programs that attempted to help restore the nation and more specifically, the economy, back to a functional condition. In his inaugural address, Roosevelt stated that “[r]estoration calls, however, not for changes in ethics alone. This Nation asks for action, and action now.” Roosevelt’s plan to help America was referred to as the New Deal, …show more content…
The New Deal did have many positive effects on the nation including unemployment benefits, allowing low income people to be homeowners, insuring bank deposits, etc. Most importantly, due to Roosevelt, the American people changed their out look on government intervention regarding the economy and their personal lives. People were thrown into such a panic and despair after the depression that they needed to look to somebody to help them out of that hole. In this case, it was Roosevelt who the people turned to. He was headstrong and brought many new ideas to the table. They were won over during the elections when he promised them a new America and he tried to do that for the people. However, things do not always go according to plan. The people saw that the government was actually caring about their welfare and the health of the economy, but soon the New Deal was brought more to light. So many people in opposition came out and fought against the plans. They warned against unfair taxes and the problem with such strict government regulation hovering over every system. In conclusion, Roosevelt’s New Deal changed the nation forever, some of the policies implemented still remain today and continue to aid in American life. He promised a new system and that is exactly what Roosevelt brought to America after the Great

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