Frankenstein Is An Allusion To Satan In John Milton's Frankenstein

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James Wohlpart contends that Mary Shelley “defines the nature of artistic production in her own society, especially as that production emerges from a male poetic” (265) through the relationship of the Creator and the Monster. In other words, Wohlpart believes that Shelley is pondering the ethical nature of the poets of her era, which were predominantly male. Wohlpart continues to argue that Shelley is creating an allegory between the artist and God while further asserting that the creator must always take responsibility for his or her creations. The creator’s responsibility and role is mirrored throughout Frankenstein through Victor Frankenstein’s character and how he slowly accepts the consequences of his work and welcomes the guilt that accompanies. …show more content…
Across each discipline, the novel is carefully analyzed the themes of creativity and responsibility in mind. For the sake of this summary, I will only focus on Frankenstein and how it relates to the discipline of literature. The author contends that the monster in Frankenstein is merely an allusion to Satan from John Milton’s Paradise Lost. The distant relationship between the archetypal character of Satan and his Creator serve as a template for Shelley’s novel. In Paradise Lost, the audience is oddly able to identify with Satan because his “emotional needs” are not met by his own Creator. In the poem, God bestows unlimited knowledge to his angels with the intent that they would undoubtedly accept his supremacy and his “plan for creation” (51). Satan revels at the idea that God refuses to acknowledge angels as individual beings as opposed to symbols that represent the divine glory of their Creator. Similarly, In Frankenstein, Victor’s character possesses a characteristic unwillingness to attempt to comprehend the monster he created as something beyond the abhorrent being that it physically is. This prejudice is the reasoning behind the creature’s violent outlashes. This imminent urge to obtain revenge against his Creator also parallel the war Satan waged on God. Victor was clueless as to how he was going to implement the monster into a …show more content…
Segal argues that the message behind Frankenstein is to press scientists to “take moral considerations into account” (861) when conducting or deciding to conduct experiments, while also stating that scientists must be held responsible for any and all outcomes whether it be desirable or destructive. Segal argues that experiments should be brought to a halt if they become a detriment to society or harmful in any way. Frankenstein was published in 1818. This is hardly surprising because science, as we know it, was beginning to take shape and was only really prevalent among those wealthy and educated. Because of the exclusive nature of science in its early stages, there were very few, if any, regulations on what scientists could and could not do, or even what they should and should not do. Segal argues that Shelley is not irked by Victor’s attempt to create life unnaturally, but how he decides to do so in such a private manner as to keep his research hidden away so that, if the day comes that he is able to reveal his new scientific breakthrough to the world, he’d be granted instant fame and he’d be remembered in time. Segal continues by contending that Shelley is not disturbed by Victor’s usage of deceased animals and people but by the fact that Victor himself is not shaken by this sick act. Shelley, like many of her peers, was intrigued by the notion that electricity when administered to corpses “produced signs of life” (861). We can infer that

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