Frankenstein As An Addiction In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Superior Essays
In Paul Iori’s previous essay, Strange Case of Being Human, he said, “Jekyll is an addict and that is why he is not human”(Iori 1). Jekyll was an addicted to Hyde and that ultimately turned him into a monster. He is addicted to being Hyde and commits many heinous deeds as Hyde. Jekyll is not the only one that is an addict. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, the creature is addicted to getting revenge on his creator, Victor. Victor created the creature and after he created the creature, Victor simply left the creature by himself with no guidance in the world. Victor and the creature are both monsters. The creature shows an addiction, which is revenge on Victor, but Victor does not show an addiction. He is not addicted to anything, yet he still …show more content…
He tried to belong with the De Lacey family, but they outcast him too. Chris Baldick, in The Reception of Frankenstein, says, “Treat a person ill, and he will become wicked” (Baldick 244). The creature was treated poorly everywhere he went. He eventually became wicked because of the lack of support he received from the people he cared about. The creature did try to become good. He tried talking to the father of the De Lacey family who was blind. It was going swimmingly until people saw his appearance. Felix attacked the creature when he was trying to become their friends. The creature felt betrayed, indignant and full of righteous rage, which is going to make him do the wrong thing. He lashed out and defended himself. While the creature was litigating his story, everyone around him was sure they were in the right at the time. What would someone do if they came home and saw a behemoth of a man talking to their blind father and they never saw the person before. It is important to deliberate what you do next after you become angry. That is what separates a human from a monster. The creature lashes out instead of confronting Victor. When he does confront Victor he demands him to do his bidding and then threatens him. If the creature instead were to fine some middle ground with Victor some solution may have presented itself in which they would have coincided in …show more content…
The creature is addicted to revenge in such away that it consumes his whole life and in the later part of the book that is all he thinks about. Someone can become negligent and watch something they created become something they fear. He can stand idly by content with the fact that they have not necessarily created a monster but have treat in such a way that it becomes a monster. Victor abandons the creature and instead of trying to reach out to him at any point, he cowers away and appeases the creature and lets him do whatever he wants. One can also be blinded by anger and become a monster through lashing out instead of trying to find middle ground with the person or people that upset them. The creature could have reasoned with Victor instead of demanding to make him a companion and threatening his family. Instead of the entire lashing out he could have tried to work something out reasonably and who knows, he may have had a good relationship with Victor after a calm

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