Frankenstein And Grendel Comparison

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Comparison Essay The character of Grendel in John Gardner's novel and the Monster from Mary Shelley's novel are very similar because of the two character's loneliness, aggressive behavior, and inner conflict. Grendel deals with loneliness throughout the entirety of the novel. Grendel's loneliness is due in large part by his exclusion by Hrothgar's people. Grendel's loneliness influences alot of his actions and increases as time goes on. While observing the Hrothgar's people Grendel says, "Why can't I have someone to talk to? The Shaper has people to talk to, Hrothgar has people to talk to."(Gardner 53) This quote shows how lonely Grendel is and that he wants to have friends to talk to. Another one of Grendel's traits is his aggressive behavior …show more content…
The Monster, just like Grendel, deals with loneliness from the beginning of the book. Loneliness for both characters plays a big role in shaping the type of person they become. The Monster expresses his loneliness when he is talking with Victor and pleads " I am alone and miserable: man will not associate with me; but one as deformed and horrible as myself would not deny herself to me. My companion must be of the same species and have the defects. This being you must create".(Shelley 129) Just like Grendel, the Monster seeks companionship and is hurt over his loneliness. Another trait that both the characters share is an aggressive behavior. The Monster shows no problem with attacking and killing people and does so several times throughout the novel. The monster threatens to Victor, "I will be with you on your wedding-night".(Shelley 94) The monsters remark shows his aggressive nature as he threatens to attack Victor in the future. The last trait that Monster shares with Grendel is his inner conflict. The Monster states to Victor, "Cursed, cursed creator! Why did I live? Why, in that instant, did I not extinguish the spark of existence which you had so wantonly bestowed? I know not; despair had not yet taken possession of me; my feelings were those of rage and revenge."(Shelley 75) As the monster states he is conflicted on why he was created and is even enraged. The Monsters inner conflict is

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